Kalpana Chawla Space Policy Dialogue 2019 Day 2 highlights: It's time to talk about India's space explorations & her challenges

Space governance, international cooperation, security, women in space & space exploration.

Update: India has alot of ambitions for space travel and rightly so however, we face obstacles as well.  

Update: Women ins space, the fourth panel is the most awaited of them all with women talking about their struggles and how they can overcome it. 

Update: The third panel talks about security in space but it seems bleak with everyone wanting to best the other.

Update: In the second panel, the main points we need to remember is that established countries in space need to lending a helping hand to the developing nations. 

Update: The first spotlight speaker, Dr. A Sivathanu Pillai spoke about tapping resources from outer space for the betterment of the World and that the next generation is future that we must encourage. 

Update: The key take away from the first panel discussion was that it is hard to avoid militarisation of space and that the politics of Earth will create problems in space. The only way to get through this is dialogue and communication.  

Update: There will be three spotlight speakers Wing Commander Neelu Khatri, Lt. Gen. Taranjit Singh, A Sivathanu Pillai, ISRO who will be shining light on some pretty interesting topics as well. 

The Observer Research Foundation (ORF) has gathered experts from the world over for the fifth edition of the Kalpana Chawla Space Policy Dialogue.

The three-day event features talks and panels from leaders in the space industry, successful entrepreneurs, space law and academia. The Dialogue is centred around current issues and challenges in space today.

The three-day event, starting 29 April 2019, is also (importantly) a tool to advocate for a national space policy for India. This, in the view of ORF, will go a long way in encouraging space startups, entrepreneurship and innovation across security, civil and commercial uses of space exploration and technology.

Kalpana Chawla Space Policy Dialogue 2019 Day 2 highlights: Its time to talk about Indias space explorations & her challenges

Kalpana Chawla. Image:NASA

The Dialogue gets its name from Dr Kalpana Chawla, the first woman astronaut of Indian-American descent to have flown in space.

There are a few key themes in this edition of the event:

  1. Space governance: How common goods like space can be collectively governed
  2. Space cooperation: How powerful players in space can assist emerging ones
  3. Women in Space
  4. How to increase participation in the private sector
  5. Space security: Protecting a nation's space assets
  6. The small satellite business: Prospects, challenges, risks and all
  7. A Space Policy for India
  8. The ambitions and challenges of space exploration in India

highlights

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LIVE NEWS and UPDATES ONLINE

  • 20:03 (IST)

    And that's a wrap for Day 2 of the ORFKC 

    We have come to the closing stages of the ORF Kalpana Chawla Space Dialogue. There were a lot of discussions about India's future in space and more topics. What can we expect tomorrow? Prospects of Small Satellites, Space and Telecommunications, Indian Space Industry And Propulsion, Space policy and more. Stay tuned to our live blog tomorrow and good night!

  • 19:48 (IST)

  • 19:47 (IST)

    At the panel of India and Europe in Space

    Report on space collaboration between India & EU launched today
     
    ESPI & ORF has released a new report today at the Dialogue about the collaboration between the European and Indian space agencies.
     

  • 19:43 (IST)

  • 19:38 (IST)

    At the panel of India and Europe in Space

    Panelists in this conversation are Jean-Jacques Tortora ​Director, European Space Policy Institute (ESPI), Tomasz Kolowski  EU Ambassador to India and Narayan Prasad Co-Founder, SatSearch.

  • 19:26 (IST)

  • 19:25 (IST)

    *Astrobiology research in India is real - and cool!*

  • 17:48 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Exploration

  • 17:47 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Exploration

    Does space need artists too?

    Divyanshu Poddar: Oh yes it does. There's a big human element to being a space-faring race. And that's a role artists play better than anyone.

  • 17:39 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Exploration

    Fear of failure limits our youngest engineers

    Divyanshu Pandey: One of the biggest takeaways from  working as an educator is that students aren't ready to lose. Once it's over, it really is over for them and that's something our training programs need to include. There's plenty more, but the fear of failure is very limiting for our young engineers.

  • 17:29 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Exploration

  • 17:28 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Exploration

    One way to do this is a separate working group for space exploration and education

    Siddharth Pandey: Education outreach is a strong component in the roadmap, and is being left out of the conversation. If we want to venture into more science and exploration, we need to start bottom up, and that starts in schools.

  • 17:23 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Exploration

  • 17:22 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Exploration

    Exploration can be a priority for India but isn't​ 

    Siddharth Pandey: I think ISRO needs to be certain, and yet adaptable with its space program. It is a unique position in terms on its budget and ambition to do a bit of both - technology and exploration. One of the way it can do that is partner with larger space agencies on the BIG missions.

  • 17:22 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Exploration 

    Is the Indian space program ambitious?

    Ajay Lele: Ambitious isn't the goal of India's space program to begin with. So far, India has been adapting itself to become a tool to add to its socio-economic development. Space exploration is one area where we haven't really flexed our muscles, but could perhaps do it once national priorities change.

  • 17:20 (IST)

    It's time for the next panel on the ambitions and challenges of India's space programs

    Panelists in this conversation are Ajey Lele, Senior Fellow, Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses; Siddharth Pandey, Head of Amity Space Centre and the Centre of Excellence in Astrobiology, Amity University and Divyanshu Poddar and will be moderated by Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan, Distinguished Fellow and Head, Nuclear and Space Policy Initiative, Observer Research Foundation.

  • 16:49 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

  • 16:47 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

    Q. Neelu Khatri: What companies in India do you think can spearhead the effort to help build policies for the space sector?

    A: I’ve been part of a couple of global companies that have come to India, but the national space agency is less than liberal with opportunities to expand in the sector. The contracts to partner with private industry need to be nurturing, and not limiting.

  • 16:43 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

  • 16:27 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

    Gender laws in space: We have a lot to (un)learn

    Ashok G V: Before we write laws for space and other planets, we need to unlearn what we "know" We need to start teaching people that gender isn't binary any more, it is also a choice today. I worked on a case once when a group of transgender people legally objected to another transgender person being in a lesbian relationship with a woman. Theres an example of the complexity that gender laws for the future of space needs to consider.

  • 16:21 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

  • 16:20 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

    Can we afford to have the same gender stereotypes in space that we do here on Earth?

  • 16:18 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

    Women astronauts have had it BAD so far

    Ashok G V: A lot of things came in the way of women astronauts taking flight over the years. The first studies looking at the effects of space on women were early - in the 70s - but those too, were so there'd be secretaries, cooks and caretakers in space like here on Earth.

  • 16:13 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

  • 16:13 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

    Women are their own solution to gender parity in the space industry

    Wing Commander Neelu Khatri: What amazes me is the grit and fierceness with with some women work in the industry. Global companies want some of our finest women in space. The ground is not very even for women in this industry specifically, but turning your threats to opportunities falls on the women themselves for now. It's on us, and I firmly believe that.

  • 16:04 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

  • 16:03 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

    Being a space entrepreneurs means freedom

    Susmita Mohanty says that, "I left Boeing and started my first company, Moonfront, with a friend. I did it because being an entrepreneur affords you freedom. You can speak your mind in a way that you simply can't in a company that isn't yours. Back then "startups" were very rare. Today, it's almost every tenth word we hear."

  • 16:01 (IST)

    At the panel for Women in Space

  • 16:01 (IST)

    Women in Space panel kicks off

    The next conversation is the much-awaited women in space dialogue. This is the first time ORF has included it in their space dialogue. Panelists include Susmita Mohanty, Co-Founder and CEO, Earth2Orbit; Wing Commander Neelu Khatri, CEO, Boston Analytics; Ashok G V, Partner, Factum Law and Surbhi Bhagotia, Scientist D, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO. They will be moderated by Jessica West, Program Officer, Project Ploughshares.

  • 15:51 (IST)

    Spotlight Speaker 

  • 15:28 (IST)

    Spotlight Speaker 

  • 15:23 (IST)

    Spotlight Speaker 

    What’s it like being a member of India’s private space industry?

    Wing Commander Neelu Khatri, President of Honeywell Aerospace, takes the stage to shed some light on the good, bad and ugly of running a private sector space enterprise in India

  • 15:14 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security

    Alexandra Stickings: We saw this with China’s recent landing on the moon’a far side as well, the media immediately jumped to show the possible military implications of the achievement. Despite their growing presence in space, I think that’s an unfair way to see all the progress China makes in space.

  • 15:12 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security

    Are China’s growing military capabilities in space disguised in their tech advances in space?

    Chandrashekhar Srinivasan: The Chinese space station will be open to international collaboration, and its important to remember that any activity has both civilian and military uses.

  • 15:03 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security

    Jean-Jacques Tortora: By the year, space is growing to have a larger influence from private space industry, and they will have a greater role to play in security. I'm rather hopefully and happy to share that thought with you all today.

  • 14:55 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security

  • 14:47 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security

  • 14:47 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security

  • 14:38 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security

  • 14:33 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security

    EU's Code of Conduct a strong indicator of its interest in space security

    Jean-Jacques Tortora: Although the EU's Code of Conduct had a short period of effectiveness, the fact that EU drew up a space security policy of its own goes to show it's interest and dedication towards ensure safety in space.

  • 14:31 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security

  • 14:14 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security 

  • 14:13 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security 

    China’s interest in militarizing space comes in many different forms

  • 14:10 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security 

    Cyber threats aren’t one, they are enablers of many others weapons, too

    Chandrashekhar Srinivasan: Space is now a very critical component in war. Nuclear and conventional weapons may have been married decades ago, but cyber threats are something that’s linked to all of them.

  • 14:05 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security 

  • 14:04 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security 

  • 14:04 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security 

    Alexandra Stickings says "With the growing number of uses for space technology, you don’t have to be a space actor to have an influence or impact on space security. Any new space security policy will need to be open to these threat growing in form every few years, if not every decade."

  • 14:03 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Security 

  • 14:02 (IST)

    The third panel for the day, on Space security, is now a-go

    Panelists speaking on it are Alexandra Stickings, Space Policy Fellow from RUSI; Chandrashekhar Srinivasan from the NIAS; Col. P S Bath, Director of the space Perspective Planning Directorate in the Indian Army and Jean-Jacques Tortora, Director of ESPI. The discussion will be moderated by Victoria Samson, Washington Office Director, Secure World Foundation. 

  • 12:46 (IST)

    At the panel for Space Cooperation




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