Iron Man-inspired astronaut helmet has heads-up display to assist with space missions

The firm designing & making them is actively seeking clients in space agencies & the military.


It may not be all that foreign an idea: a helmet with an inbuilt heads-up display. But the fact that there's a company out there demonstrating it for space agencies to invest in, that's undeniably cool!

Inspired by none other than Iron Man himself, an artificial and machine intelligence company has designed a helmet with a heads-up display (HUD) for astronauts. The firm claims that their display could help astronauts maneuver and manage complex space missions more easily.

The "HyperVSR" helmet can display information like mission-related instructions, information as well as the astronaut's vital signs. With inputs like this, the safety of an astronaut is likely much-improved by reducing how much they have to move in their spacesuits with information at their fingertips, Ben Lamm, CEO of Hypergiant, told Futurism.

Considering the unpredictability of space, challenges are a lot more dramatic and need to be attended to far more quickly. Even small movements take longer in low-gravity environments than in the familiar gravity of Earth. AI-powered HUD helmets could go a long way in helping astronauts with solutions in emergencies, Lamm added.

Iron Man-inspired astronaut helmet has heads-up display to assist with space missions

Spacesuit helmet with Iron Man HUD. Image courtesy: Hypergiant Industries

"During these situations, it's paramount that astronaut safety is never in question. We've designed our helmet to enable astronauts to quickly gather information about a situation, as well as assess their own health, for enhanced decision-making even during emergencies."

But the coolest part of the helmet is how an astronaut can choose what to see: with their eye movements. The gloves of the spacesuit are embedded with tags in different parts. The helmet observes which of the tags the astronaut is looking at and throws the information linked with the specific tag onto the HUD.

Guess that kind of privacy invasion wouldn't really bother astronauts since they've got AI bots running around the space station observing and helping them out with tasks at the space station all day long.

The software powering the helmet is still a work in progress at the moment, according to Futurism, but the company is actively looking for clientele in space agencies and military contractors alike.

We're really into the future now, eh?