Black hole event horizon: Stunning images of black holes we've never actually seen

The Event Horizon Project is expected to release the first-ever direct image of a black hole's edge. As you get closer and closer to the centre of a black hole, space becomes much more curved. It eventually curves into space from within which even light can’t escape: the ‘event horizon’. Image: Pixabay/JohnsonMartin
<1/16>

The Event Horizon Project is expected to release the first-ever direct image of a black hole's edge. As you get closer and closer to the centre of a black hole, space becomes much more curved. It eventually curves into space from within which even light can’t escape: the ‘event horizon’. Image: Pixabay/JohnsonMartin

A dust-bound supermassive black hole [artist's impression] Image: ESA/Hubble, the AVO project and Paolo Padovani
<2/16

A dust-bound supermassive black hole [artist's impression] Image: ESA/Hubble, the AVO project and Paolo Padovani

The fictional Miller’s planet orbiting the black hole 'Gargantua' in the movie Interstellar. Image: Interstellarfilm.wikia.com/Paramount Pictures
<3/16

The fictional Miller’s planet orbiting the black hole 'Gargantua' in the movie Interstellar. Image: Interstellarfilm.wikia.com/Paramount Pictures

The black hole named Cygnus X-1 in the Milky Way galaxy was formed when a large star collapsed in on itself. This artist's illustration depicts what astronomers think happened within the Cygnus X-1 system. Image: NASA
<4/16

The black hole named Cygnus X-1 in the Milky Way galaxy was formed when a large star collapsed in on itself. This artist's illustration depicts what astronomers think happened within the Cygnus X-1 system. Image: NASA

This image shows visible/near-infrared images taken by NASA's Hubble telescope showing a massive star ~25 times the Sun's mass, that has winked out of existence – leaving no supernova or other explanation behind. Image: NASA/ESA/C. Kochanek
<5/16

This image shows visible/near-infrared images taken by NASA's Hubble telescope showing a massive star ~25 times the Sun's mass, that has winked out of existence – leaving no supernova or other explanation behind. Image: NASA/ESA/C. Kochanek

These visible/near-infrared images taken by NASA's Hubble telescope show a massive star ~25 times the Sun's mass, that has winked out of existence leaving no supernova or other explanation behind. Image: NASA/ESA/STScI
<6/16

These visible/near-infrared images taken by NASA's Hubble telescope show a massive star ~25 times the Sun's mass, that has winked out of existence leaving no supernova or other explanation behind. Image: NASA/ESA/STScI

A supermassive black hole with more than 4.1 million times the mass of the Sun is right in the centre of the Milky Way, just 26,000 light-years away! And as we speak, it’s in the process of tearing apart entire stars and star systems. Image: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr
<7/16

A supermassive black hole with more than 4.1 million times the mass of the Sun is right in the centre of the Milky Way, just 26,000 light-years away! And as we speak, it’s in the process of tearing apart entire stars and star systems. Image: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr

An interactive <strong><a rel=visualisation of the black hole at the centre of the Milky Way. Image: ESA Advanced Concepts Team (Images and code), ESO/S Brunier (Milky Way background)." title="An interactive visualisation of the black hole at the centre of the Milky Way. Image: ESA Advanced Concepts Team (Images and code), ESO/S Brunier (Milky Way background)." data-url="https://www.firstpost.com/tech/photos/black-hole-event-horizons-stunning-images-of-black-holes-weve-never-actually-seen-6420191-8.html" data-desc="An interactive visualisation of the black hole at the centre of the Milky Way. Image: ESA Advanced Concepts Team (Images and code), ESO/S Brunier (Milky Way background)." data-index="18" data-photo-id="8">
<8/16

An interactive visualisation of the black hole at the centre of the Milky Way. Image: ESA Advanced Concepts Team (Images and code), ESO/S Brunier (Milky Way background).

A supermassive black hole consuming matter from a nearby star [artistic illustration]. Image: NASA/JLP-Caltech
<9/16

A supermassive black hole consuming matter from a nearby star [artistic illustration]. Image: NASA/JLP-Caltech

An artist's illustration of a black hole apocalypse. Image credit: NOVA/WGBH
<10/16

An artist's illustration of a black hole apocalypse. Image credit: NOVA/WGBH

A black holes curves space-time [artist's concept]. Image: NOVA/WGBH
<11/16

A black holes curves space-time [artist's concept]. Image: NOVA/WGBH

Would you survive if you travel through an enormous black hole like in the movies? Physicists have been studying the notion, and they think there's no chance we'll survive one. Image: Roen Kelly/Discover
<12/16

Would you survive if you travel through an enormous black hole like in the movies? Physicists have been studying the notion, and they think there's no chance we'll survive one. Image: Roen Kelly/Discover

Jets of energy and matter being thrown out from the centre of the Hercules A galaxy, at nearly the speed of light. This demonstrates the awesome destructive power of black holes [artistic concept based on Hubble data]. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech
<13/16

Jets of energy and matter being thrown out from the centre of the Hercules A galaxy, at nearly the speed of light. This demonstrates the awesome destructive power of black holes [artistic concept based on Hubble data]. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Massive jets propelling away from the black hole at the centre of Centaurus A Galaxy, 13 million light-years away. The jets alone stretch further in space than the Galaxy itself. Image: ESO/WFI/MPIfR/APEX/NASA/CXC
<14/16

Massive jets propelling away from the black hole at the centre of Centaurus A Galaxy, 13 million light-years away. The jets alone stretch further in space than the Galaxy itself. Image: ESO/WFI/MPIfR/APEX/NASA/CXC

The aftermath of two merging neutron stars observed in 2017 (pictured), suggests that a black hole was created from the merger [artist's illustration] Image: NSA/LIGO/Sonoma State University
<15/16

The aftermath of two merging neutron stars observed in 2017 (pictured), suggests that a black hole was created from the merger [artist's illustration] Image: NSA/LIGO/Sonoma State University

A close-up of the Sagittarius A* black hole in the Milky Way seen in X-rays only by NASA's Chandra Observatory. The falsely blue-coloured X-rays being emitted are from hot gas captured by the black hole that is being pulled inwards. Image: NASA
<16/16

A close-up of the Sagittarius A* black hole in the Milky Way seen in X-rays only by NASA's Chandra Observatory. The falsely blue-coloured X-rays being emitted are from hot gas captured by the black hole that is being pulled inwards. Image: NASA





also see

science