Rio Olympics 2016: Experts warn of hackers, phishing scams, and other Internet frauds

The report adds how its not just visitors who are at risk, but also huge multinational companies such as Coca Cola, GE, Visa, Samsung and others. Moreover, users watching Rio Olympics from home may also not be safe as hackers could find ways to target them.

Brazil, ranked eighth by 2016 Internet Security Threat Report for bot-enabled cyber crimes, is currently hosting Olympics 2016. While athletes are preparing for Rio Olympics, and so are hackers. A FastCompany report now highlights how visitors have to be extremely careful with digital safety. In the report, Thomas Fischer, principal threat researcher at security firm Digital Guardian calls Olympics a prime target for attackers.

The report adds how its not just visitors who are at risk, but also huge multinational companies such as Coca Cola, GE, Visa, Samsung and others. Moreover, users watching Rio Olympics from home may also not be safe as hackers could find ways to target them.

Olympics fans are seen as an easy target of email phishing scams. For instance, scammers aiming to sell fake tickets to users looking to watch the games, something Kaspersky had warned a few months ago. Well, it may not just end here. When a user buys these counterfeit tickets, they key in essential details, which can be used to steal money.

Symantec points out that 2012 Olympics saw reportedly 166 million security-related events including a few major attacks, and Brazil may not be different. Rather, there is more to worry as Brazil is already responsible for 2 percent of Internet-related crimes last year.

Cyber criminals may also send email scams such as inviting fans to gamble on the games. In fact, in such a case, the victim may not be even file a complaint, for obvious reasons.

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The report also highlights another incident involving credit card fraud. "A card fitted with a doctored chip can insert malware into legitimate card readers, which transmits future card information and personal data to thieves, who can quickly clone the cards. Another common scheme in Brazil involves so-called Chupa Cabras, plastic skimmers inserted into the card slots of ATMs," points out the report.

Another problem highlighted by the report is criminals setting up rogue Wi-Fi access points, which also includes setting unencrypted users names and passwords and also inject malware into web traffic. Fischer explains that those using open Wi-Fi can also opt for VPN.

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