Parents driving teenagers away from Facebook: Report

It’s official. Facebook is indeed having teen problems. The social networking website that was once the hotbed of teenage activities is now struggling to

It’s official. Facebook is indeed having teen problems. The social networking website that was once the hotbed of teenage activities is now struggling to connect to its younger audiences. The basic problem lies with the site becoming uncool because of parents and the older population joining the website.

Teenagers are generally deserting Facebook for greener pastures like Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter, far from the prying eyes of elders. Social media expert Michael McQueen calls this migration the “Levi’s Effect,” named after the famous brand of denims.

"Son, can I join Facebook too?" (Image credit: Getty Images)

 

What’s the Levi’s Effect? Well, it’s an item or product that was cool, hep, the bee’s knees for the younger populace – until their parents joined in the fad. Facebook was a social networking website that appealed to teenagers 10 years ago when it just burst onto the scene. It remained popular for the longest time with generation after generation of youngsters being acquainted with it. Unfortunately, the popularity of Facebook also meant parents and audiences over the age of 30 joining in the craze. That’s where the site’s popularity starts to dip.

The phenomenon is named Levi’s Effect to explain Facebook’s condition because of its uncanny resemblance to Levi Jeans. According to McQueen, ''Levi jeans were a cool, young brand - until parents started wearing them - and the same thing has happened with Facebook.”

The social networking website’s teenager woes came to light earlier this year when its Q3 results were released. Earlier rumoured, Facebook’s CFO, David Ebersman, confirmed that teenagers were indeed abandoning Facebook. Multiple reports have suggested that services like YouTube, WhatsApp, WeChat, Twitter and Snapchat have been benefiting from this teenage exodus. While no study has come up with conclusive data, we can only imagine Facebook become a site for fuddy-duddies.

 

(With inputs from agencies)

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