Google brings back popular Doodle games so you stay home, stay safe and have some fun

Google's 'Throwback Doodle series' has been launched to look back at some of the most interactive Google Doodle games.


In a bid to encourage people to stay at home amid the coronavirus outbreak, Google has started a ‘Stay and Play at Home’ doodle series. Basically, Google wants you to cure your boredom with fun games while you are stuck at home.

Today's Google Doodle celebrates 30th anniversary of PAC-MAN who was an arcade game and pinball technician. In today's PAC MAN game, you will see a maze-like design that spells out Google. To play the game, tap on the doodle and then either press the “Insert Coin” button or just wait for a few seconds. The game brings back ghosts’ individual personalities, and even recreate original bugs from this 1980’s masterpiece.

 Google brings back popular Doodle games so you stay home, stay safe and have some fun

PAC-MAN Google Doodle

Day 9's doodle brought us a game called Hip-Hop! This doodle celebrated the 44th anniversary of the birth of Hip Hop. In this game, you can choose which track to create and with the help of two turntables you can just play the record of your choice.

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Day 8's doodle leads you to Halloween 2016 game. In this game, you will play as a cat and you will have to fight off ghosts by drawing the suggested figures by the wand.

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Day 7's doodle directs you to Lotería game. It is a multiplayer traditional Mexican Card game where out of 16 cards, you have to arrange the cards in the given order with the help of beans. The first one to arrange them correctly wins.

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Day 6's google doodle brought a game called Scoville which celebrated 151st birthday of Wilbur Scoville who is perhaps best remembered for his organoleptic test, which uses human testers to measure pungency in peppers. In this game, you play as an ice cream scoop and fight against various kinds of pepper.

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Day 5's Google doodle was about a game called Garden Gnomewhere you had to decorate a garden with gnomes according to the instructions given.

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Day 4 doodle lead you to a game called Rockmore that will let you play Theremin. Basically, you will be given lessons that you need to follow to reach the next level.  The game is inspired by Clara Rockmore who was a famous Theremin player. This doodle was first released on 9 March 2016 to mark her 105 birthday. Popular Google Doodle games will be brought back through this series. It began with 2017’s hit game Coding which was released to mark the 50th anniversary of Kids Coding.

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“As COVID-19 continues to impact communities around the world, people and families everywhere are spending more time at home,” read the description. It added that keeping in view the situation, the “throwback Doodle series” has been launched to look back at some of the most interactive Google Doodle games.

Day 3's Google doodle leads you to a music inspired game called Fischinger. To play this game, all you need to do is click on the screen to create your own music compositions. You will also get an option to change the instrument if you want.

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This doodle was first published on 22 June 2017 to mark the birthday of Oskar Fischinger who was very well known for his abstract musical animation.

On day 2 (28 April), the doodle led users to play cricket online.

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On 27 April, clicking on the doodle redirected the user to a page where one can play the interactive game.

While the tech giant has started the series with ‘Coding’, upcoming games from the Google Doodle archive are hidden for now, and will presumably only be available on the day of their re-launch.

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The Coding doodle was first launched on 4 December 2017, during the Computer Science Education Week. In the 6-level game of Coding for Carrots, players are required to move a rabbit across tiles to eat their “favourite food” — carrots — by stacking coding blocks one after the other.

This was based on the Scratch programming language. Scratch is a children-specific block-based visual programming language created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

The aim was to make computers more accessible and welcoming to kids. It was “designed to be less intimidating than typical programming languages, but just as powerful and expressive”.


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