Boeing completes software update for 737 Max planes that caused crashes in the past

Boeing has flown the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software for more than 360 hours on 207 flights.

Boeing has announced that it has finally completed the software update for the 737 Max planes that had caused deadly crashes in the recent past.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is yet to provide certification and Boeing is providing additional information related to how pilots interact with airplane controls and displays in different flight scenarios, according to an official release.

Boeing completes software update for 737 Max planes that caused crashes in the past

The Boeing 737 series first entered production in 1967.

To date, the company has flown the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software for more than 360 hours on 207 flights. Boeing says that the 737 Max with the updated MCAS software will be one of the safest airplanes ever to fly.

"With safety as our clear priority, we have completed all of the engineering test flights for the software update and are preparing for the final certification flight," Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg told AFP in a statement. "The accidents have only intensified our commitment to our values, including safety, quality and integrity, because we know lives depend on what we do," he said.

The FAA has reportedly also called a 23 May meeting of international civil aviation regulators in Texas to discuss the FAA's process for clearing the 737 MAX to resume service.

With inputs from ANI and AFP.

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