After Google, Bing to come up with fact-checking labels to combat fake news

The label on Bing would allow the user to fact-check the sources, also know which information is true or false

After Google, now Bing has added a fact-checking label. This label will help users with fact-checking information given in news stories and articles which appear on the Bing search results.

After Google, Bing to come up with fact-checking labels to combat fake news

Bing has come with tools to combat fake news. Bing.

According to Bing’s blog, the fact-checking label would be applicable to news results, webpages, and information. This would help them in checking the trustworthiness of the information provided.

The label would allow the user to fact-check the sources, also know which information is true or false.

In order to label news information with this tag, the user has to be certain that their work meets the criteria asked by the search engine. This includes, transparency and citation. Moreover, it also suggests that the claims made ‘must be easily identifiable within the body of fact-checking sites.’

Also it takes help from third-party organisations, like Snopes or PolitFact and other fact-checking organisations.

Bing has introduced fact-checking tool for news information. Bing blog.

Bing has introduced fact-checking tool for news information. Bing blog.

In the process of fact-checking, after every news article it gives the verdict as true or false.

However, Bing did mention that it has its own review system which requires users putting up news articles to fill up certain criteria so as to be certain of the credibility of news information. However, it also said that Bing may or may not show a verdict for every news article. This means not all articles will be shown with the fact-checking mark, leaving the credibility factor hanging.

Off late fake news has become a problem for most of the news organisations and consumers of news as well. Thus, Google began attacking fake news in late December after several embarrassing examples of misleading information appeared near the top of its search engine. Among other things, Google's search engine pointed to a website that incorrectly reported then President-elect Donald Trump had won the popular vote in the US election, that President Barack Obama was planning a coup and that the Holocaust never occurred during World War II.

Learning from the US Presidential elections 'fake news' fiasco, Facebook had rolled out a tool to help Kenyan users spot fake news ahead of a hotly-contested presidential election that had seen supporters of rival candidates trade bitter words online.

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