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Ducks, Newburyport review: Navigating the exhausting beauty of Lucy Ellmann's mindscape
Life

Ducks, Newburyport review: Navigating the exhausting beauty of Lucy Ellmann's mindscape

Reading Lucy Ellmann's 1,000-plus pages, (almost, but not quite) single sentence long Ducks, Newburyport is an experience (as one would imagine) unlike any other I've come across in recent times.

Girl, Woman, Other review: Bernardine Evaristo's novel is a boisterous, life-affirming storytelling experiment
Life

Girl, Woman, Other review: Bernardine Evaristo's novel is a boisterous, life-affirming storytelling experiment

Bernardine Evaristo has said that her theatre writing and poetry background have seeped into her novel, and Girl, Woman, Other is written in a style that she calls 'fusion fiction': free-flowing, unpunctuated, with a cadence that — in the best portions — approaches lyricism

10 Minutes 38 Seconds in this Strange World review: Arresting premise, hobbled potential in Elif Shafak's latest 
Life

10 Minutes 38 Seconds in this Strange World review: Arresting premise, hobbled potential in Elif Shafak's latest 

Elif Shafak is undoubtedly a gifted writer, and you're constantly reminded of this while reading 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in this Strange World. Unfortunately, what begins as a gripping premise with much potential, soon breaks down, tripping over its own traps of clichés and predictability.

An Orchestra of Minorities review: Chigozie Obioma delivers a contemporary Nigerian tragedy through Igbo cosmology
Life

An Orchestra of Minorities review: Chigozie Obioma delivers a contemporary Nigerian tragedy through Igbo cosmology

Chigozie Obioma, whose first novel, The Fishermen, was selected as a finalist for the Man Booker Prize in 2015, has made it back to the 2019 shortlist with his latest effort, An Orchestra of Minorities.

The Testaments review: Margaret Atwood's sequel to Handmaid's Tale is a 101 on how patriarchy works
Life

The Testaments review: Margaret Atwood's sequel to Handmaid's Tale is a 101 on how patriarchy works

The Gilead that we encounter in The Testaments is no less menacing than the one from The Handmaid's Tale, but its seams are fraying.

Quichotte book review: Salman Rushdie struggles to bring the sprawling satire to life
Life

Quichotte book review: Salman Rushdie struggles to bring the sprawling satire to life

Rushdie has continued in quasi-fantastic, magical-satirical vein but his new novel Quichotte is a development in that it is not positioned as magical realism but explicitly as satire. Whatever ‘magic’ is in evidence is decidedly authorial conceit.