Ecology

Showing of 1 - 20 from 87 results
Ecology - Total results - 87
The Zai Whitaker column | A (second) lockdown despatch from the Madras Crocodile Bank
Lifestyle

The Zai Whitaker column | A (second) lockdown despatch from the Madras Crocodile Bank

Though the eight months of lockdown have been challenging (especially financially), the Croc Bank managed to “test positive” and come up with many new ideas and changes.

Tanks are silver bullet for India's water woes; why they're disappearing, leaving us more vulnerable to a warming climate
India

Tanks are silver bullet for India's water woes; why they're disappearing, leaving us more vulnerable to a warming climate

A warming climate, bringing fewer rain days and more intense rainfall events in its wake, makes the role played by tanks even more critical.

The Zai Whitaker column | Remembering Bob and Tanya, saviours of the Western Ghats' sky islands
Lifestyle

The Zai Whitaker column | Remembering Bob and Tanya, saviours of the Western Ghats' sky islands

The Palani Hills bug bit Bob Stewart and Tanya Balcar, two young British backpackers who were travelling through southern India in 1985.

The Zai Whitaker column | What 2004 tragedy on Great Nicobar might show us about meeting coronavirus challenge
Lifestyle

The Zai Whitaker column | What 2004 tragedy on Great Nicobar might show us about meeting coronavirus challenge

The mental and physical resources that enabled Saw Agu to survive the horrific experience of the 2004 tsunami are an inspiration to us all — perhaps even a metaphor for overcoming this coronavirus pandemic and its challenges.

The Zai Whitaker column | Tragedy on Great Nicobar; a story of the 2004 tsunami in two parts
Lifestyle

The Zai Whitaker column | Tragedy on Great Nicobar; a story of the 2004 tsunami in two parts

The 15-metre wave came with a roar of rage. Saw Agu remembers the sound, and the accompanying sound of breaking trees as the water bulldozed its way through the forest.

Wildlife plummeted by two-thirds in 50 years, risk of pandemics to climb with further habitat loss: Living Planet Index
science

Wildlife plummeted by two-thirds in 50 years, risk of pandemics to climb with further habitat loss: Living Planet Index

Rates of biodiversity recovery are typically much slower than those of recent biodiversity loss, a study author highlighted.

In 10 Indian Champions Who are Fighting to Save the Planet, stories of pragmatism amid climate change
Lifestyle

In 10 Indian Champions Who are Fighting to Save the Planet, stories of pragmatism amid climate change

The people featured in the book recognise the natural world has irreversibly changed and are adapting to that new reality by drawing attention to climate change in novel ways.

In The Disaster Tourist, Yun Ko-eun critiques capitalism's ability to monetise everything — even calamity and trauma
Lifestyle

In The Disaster Tourist, Yun Ko-eun critiques capitalism's ability to monetise everything — even calamity and trauma

The Disaster Tourist challenges the reader to evaluate our curiosity about traumatised communities and landscapes that appear exciting for their unpredictability and history of ruin.

The Zai Whitaker column | In defence of zoos, and why the post-pandemic world needs them more than ever
Lifestyle

The Zai Whitaker column | In defence of zoos, and why the post-pandemic world needs them more than ever

The role of zoos as conservation centres has continued to develop over the years and today, many species have been brought back from the brink thanks to zoo initiatives.

Dhruba Hazarika’s Luck offers moving look at human-animal relations, and a counter to ideas of man as 'civilised'
Lifestyle

Dhruba Hazarika’s Luck offers moving look at human-animal relations, and a counter to ideas of man as 'civilised'

There’s an old-school charm in Hazarika’s writing that is strengthened by an emotional pacing that keeps the reader engaged.

The Zai Whitaker column | Trailing Ajay Giri (from a safe distance) while on a King Cobra rescue mission
Lifestyle

The Zai Whitaker column | Trailing Ajay Giri (from a safe distance) while on a King Cobra rescue mission

Agumbe is a unique example of how dangerous animals and people (even more dangerous) can live peacefully together. The key piece is Ajay Giri.

The Zai Whitaker column | On World Environment Day, looking back at lessons by the greatest teacher of all — time
Lifestyle

The Zai Whitaker column | On World Environment Day, looking back at lessons by the greatest teacher of all — time

Us folks in the conservation field would do well to use this lockdown time, to look back at what Time has tried to teach us collectively, as a country | Zai Whitaker writes in a humorous, introspective essay for #WorldEnvironmentDay

In Sundarbans, cyclones' worst impact not on natural areas and inhabitants, but on non-indigenous and exotic
India

In Sundarbans, cyclones' worst impact not on natural areas and inhabitants, but on non-indigenous and exotic

Repeated storm strikes have shown that it is the human communities of the Sundarbans that suffer the most. The impact of Cyclone Amphan is no different.

S Hareesh’s Moustache is a diligently told story of a troubled yet awe-inspiring land
Life

S Hareesh’s Moustache is a diligently told story of a troubled yet awe-inspiring land

S Hareesh’s novel Moustache, translated from Malayalam into English by Jayasree Kalathil, is set in Kuttanad where he has lived his entire life.

Chinese novel The Waste Tide goes where little writing ever does — the recycling industry and class inequality at its heart
Life

Chinese novel The Waste Tide goes where little writing ever does — the recycling industry and class inequality at its heart

The greatest lesson of Chinese author Chen Qiufan’s little-known novel, The Waste Tide, may be that trash is frequently invisible to those who create it — as are the people who process it, such as manual scavengers, the labourers in ship breaking yards and so on.

In times of climate crisis, why nature-journalling can be a simple, yet potent tool to build intimacy with nature
Life

In times of climate crisis, why nature-journalling can be a simple, yet potent tool to build intimacy with nature

The practice of nature-journalling has been variously adapted by enthusiasts to forms that personally suit them, with the split between scientific observation, writing and illustration varying wildly from person to person. This private note-keeping is the simplest, most accessible form of nature writing available to a wide spectrum of people, especially at a time when the world is threatened by rising fascism, climate crisis and infectious diseases, as there seems to be an urgent need for practices that will anchor us and deepen our ties to our one world.

Ramya Reddy's Soul of the Nilgiris is as much a history of place as it is a history of people
Life

Ramya Reddy's Soul of the Nilgiris is as much a history of place as it is a history of people

Ramya Reddy’s Soul of the Nilgiris is a tribute to the Nilgiris, a mountainous range whose landscape comprises shola forest and grassland, and the four indigenous groups that populate the upper regions | Urvashi Bahuguna writes in #PagesFromTheWild

A field guide to field guides: Be it a title on birds or trees, for nature enthusiasts there are few tomes as useful
Life

A field guide to field guides: Be it a title on birds or trees, for nature enthusiasts there are few tomes as useful

In this fortnight's #PagesFromTheWild column, Urvashi Bahuguna writes why field guides are the books related to nature she returns to most often — the ones that continually teach her new details and correct imperfectly remembered knowledge

Of sundews, strangler fig and elephant foot yam: Nirupa Rao's Hidden Kingdom is an ode to flora of Western Ghats
Life

Of sundews, strangler fig and elephant foot yam: Nirupa Rao's Hidden Kingdom is an ode to flora of Western Ghats

In Hidden Kingdom, the unusual plants of the Western Ghats are demystified and allowed the space they need to be understood in their singularity, Urvashi Bahuguna writes in a new column about environmental literature, #PagesFromTheWild

5 new bird species, 5 subspecies discovered on three islands in the Indonesian archipelago
science

5 new bird species, 5 subspecies discovered on three islands in the Indonesian archipelago

The birds were discovered in the Indonesian islands Taliabu and Peleng, both of which have suffered rampant forest destruction.