NBA 2019-20: Boston Celtics' Enes Kanter condemns Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan over lack of 'respect for human rights'

In basketball-mad Turkey, Kanter is regarded by Erdogan's government as a criminal because of his support for US-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, who Ankara accuses of orchestrating a coup in 2016

Agence France-Presse October 22, 2019 20:25:42 IST
NBA 2019-20: Boston Celtics' Enes Kanter condemns Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan over lack of 'respect for human rights'
  • Turkish NBA player Enes Kanter on Tuesday strongly condemned Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and the operation he launched against Kurdish forces in northern Syria

  • The 27-year-old Kanter said he would continue to speak out despite the threat of reprisals to himself and his family in Turkey

  • In basketball-mad Turkey, Kanter is regarded by Erdogan's government as a criminal because of his support for US-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, who Ankara accuses of orchestrating a coup in 2016

Washington: Turkish NBA player Enes Kanter on Tuesday strongly condemned Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and the operation he launched against Kurdish forces in northern Syria.

NBA 201920 Boston Celtics Enes Kanter condemns Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan over lack of respect for human rights

File image of Enes Kanter. AP

"(Erdogan) has no respect for human rights. There is no democracy. There is no freedom of speech, religion or expression in Turkey. He's definitely a very bad man," Kanter said of Erdogan. "I called him the Hitler of our century for a reason," the Boston Celtics center said in an interview with CNN.

Kanter, who signed with the Celtics after playing for the New York Knicks and Portland Trail Blazers last season, said what was happening to the Kurds in northern Syria was a "human tragedy."

"I have a lot of Kurd friends and they're amazing people. What's happening is a human tragedy because lots of innocent men, women, kids and babies are dying. And I think Turkey should stop its invasion in Syria," he said.

The 27-year-old Kanter said he would continue to speak out despite the threat of reprisals to himself and his family in Turkey.

"I'm trying to create awareness of what's going on because I have a platform. I'm trying to be the voice of all those innocent people who don't have one. It's very sad because in the end, it's my country. I love my country," he said.

In basketball-mad Turkey, Kanter is regarded by Erdogan's government as a criminal because of his support for US-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, who Ankara accuses of orchestrating a coup in 2016.

Kanter's support for Gulen has prompted Turkish authorities to seek an Interpol "red notice" or arrest warrant for him, meaning he could, in theory, be detained if he leaves the United States.

Turkish television has refused to broadcast NBA games involving Kanter.

Updated Date:

Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets. Get technology news, gadgets reviews & ratings. Popular gadgets including laptop, tablet and mobile specifications, features, prices, comparison.

also read

Sanjana Ramesh living and thriving in 'isolation' in build-up to second season with Northern Arizona University
Sports

Sanjana Ramesh living and thriving in 'isolation' in build-up to second season with Northern Arizona University

It’s almost easy to forget that Sanjana Ramesh is just 19. Articulate and mature, the teenager opens up about the awkwardness of giving advice to others, becoming an adult, and growing as a basketball player.

NBA: Golden State Warriors star Klay Thompson ruled out of entire 2020-2021 season with Achilles tear
Sports

NBA: Golden State Warriors star Klay Thompson ruled out of entire 2020-2021 season with Achilles tear

Klay Thompson had also missed all of last season after a knee injury he sustained in the 2019 NBA Finals

NCAA women's basketball season set to begin, but flexibility holds key in COVID-19 times
Sports

NCAA women's basketball season set to begin, but flexibility holds key in COVID-19 times

Flexibility, fluidity and adaptability are three words that every coach in the NCAA has adopted this year as team mantras.