London Olympic Village not up to India's high standards

Pareshnath Mukherjee, manager of the squad at the London Games, feels if the Village in Delhi was five-star during the Commonwealth Games, London isn't even a two-star.

FP Sports July 24, 2012 13:15:31 IST
London Olympic Village not up to India's high standards

The shoe is on the other foot now. In the lead-up to the Commonwealth Games in 2010, one of India's biggest worries was the Games Village wouldn't be up to high standards of the visiting athletes. But despite all the delays and controversies, starting with a spectacular opening ceremony, India put on a show for the entire world.

However, it seems like Great Britain hasn't quite managed to do the same. According to a report in the Hindustan Times, if the Village in Delhi was five-star, London isn't even a two-star.

London Olympic Village not up to Indias high standards

The athletes village at the London Olympics. Reuters

"If the accommodation at the Commonwealth Games was five-star, on that scale the accommodation here at the Games Village is not even two-star. With the equipment and everything else on one side, there is hardly any space to move. The rooms are so cramped," Pareshnath Mukherjee, the Archery Association of India general secretary and manager of the squad at the London Games, said.

He further added: "The Village here is absolutely spick and span. But in hindsight, the accommodation at the CWG Games was so much better and even then, we were criticised."

The British Olympic delegation might not be very happy with Mukherjee's comments but a certain Suresh Kalmadi certainly will. The Olympic Village has 2,818 new homes for East London.

But of course, this is the least of London's worries. Severe disruptions hit three of the main rail links to the Olympic Park in east London early on Monday, four days before the start of the Games, in the latest transport fiasco to raise anxiety levels in the British capital.

Adding to the stress factor, the labour union RMT announced industrial action by staff in some parts of the city's transport network during the Games to demand bonuses in recognition of the extra work involved.

In another incident, a man, who has not been named, dived off the London bridge. He had been taking part in a protest by London taxi drivers over a decision to keep them off part of a road network reserved for Olympic athletes, officials and journalists.

With inputs from agencies

Updated Date:

also read

FINA moves Diving World Cup out of Tokyo, undecided on new hosts of Olympic qualifying event
Sports

FINA moves Diving World Cup out of Tokyo, undecided on new hosts of Olympic qualifying event

FINA said it had not yet decided where the competition, which is also an Olympic qualifying event, would be held.

Tokyo Olympics 2020: Organisers planning to keep COVID-19 positive athletes, staff in separate hotel, claims report
Sports

Tokyo Olympics 2020: Organisers planning to keep COVID-19 positive athletes, staff in separate hotel, claims report

The Japanese news agency Kyodo on Sunday said organisers are working to secure 300 rooms in a hotel near the Athletes' Village

How the first Tokyo Olympics, in 1964, changed the face of Japan
Sports

How the first Tokyo Olympics, in 1964, changed the face of Japan

The first Games ever held in Asia were a chance to trumpet the rebuilding of post-war Tokyo and the country's emergence as a high-tech giant with the infrastructure to match.