Coronavirus Outbreak: Pandemic break a blessing in disguise, allowed me to reassess my game, says golfer Shubhankar Sharma

Sharma, a 2018 Asian Tour Order of Merit champion, believes he will be in better form when he tees up for what will be his first professional tournament in four months.

Press Trust of India May 29, 2020 13:34:19 IST
Coronavirus Outbreak: Pandemic break a blessing in disguise, allowed me to reassess my game, says golfer Shubhankar Sharma

Indian golfer Shubhankar Sharma says the coronavirus -forced break has been a blessing in disguise as it helped him reassess his game and mental state ahead of the resumption of action at the European Tour in July.

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FIle image of Shubhankar Sharma. AFP

Sharma, a 2018 Asian Tour Order of Merit champion, believes he will be in better form when he tees up for what will be his first professional tournament in four months.

"...I didn't have the best of starts at the start of the year. And the COVID-19 crisis was actually a blessing in disguise as it allowed me to reassess my game and mental state too," the 23-year-old, who last won at the 2018 Maybank Championship, was quoted as saying in an Asian Tour press release.

"This has been my longest layoff from golf. Apart from spending quality time with my family which was really important, I took advantage of this period to reflect on all aspects of my game."

With a July resumption target in sight, Sharma is trying to keep himself in good shape to rediscover the winning form that led him to two Asian Tour victories and the prestigious Order of Merit crown in 2018.

"There are still about two more months to go and I know I'll be totally prepared when I hit my first tee shot in a professional tournament then," he said.

"I'm also looking forward to returning and compete on the Asian Tour as it is a great Tour and brought me much success in my career," said Sharma.

Sharma started the year with a tied-59th finish in Abu Dhabi before missing the cuts in his next four starts on the European Tour.

After being left out of the weekend action again in Qatar and with his next event in Kenya cancelled due to the onset of the COVID-19 outbreak, he decided to return home early to prepare for the Hero Indian Open.

But the Commercial Bank Qatar Masters would turn out to be his last event before the pandemic brought the sporting world to a halt.

"I honestly didn't think things would get so bad with the virus until I got to Qatar where we were told Kenya would be cancelled. Then the next thing I knew was the Hero Indian Open was going to be postponed. Everything just happened so fast," said Sharma.

As most parts of the world then went into lockdown, Sharma, like many others, found ways to keeping himself entertained and occupied.

"I tried to learn how to draw but that only lasted for a few days. I tried to learn the Ukulele. My sister was teaching me for a few days. I realised I was not really making too much headway and didn't want to pursue it that much after that," he said.

With gyms, driving ranges and golf courses out of bound, Sharma decided to sharpen his skills by making "a small chipping area in his garden".

"I practised my chipping where I made a small hole in the ground and tried to hit as many chips close to that as possible," he said.

"That was interesting to me as I have not done that for a very long time. The only time I did it was when I was a kid, so it was fun reliving those days again."

With the country easing some of its lockdown measures, Sharma finally got the chance to head back to the Chandigarh Golf Club with his favourite four-ball partners -- Aadil Bedi, Karandeep Kochhar and Ajeetesh Sandhu.

He returned to hit his first shot there when it resumed operations last week.

"At first, it was more like going back to the golf course to have fun again. It didn't matter what kind of scores we shot but we just wanted to enjoy ourselves," he said.

"Then it started getting competitive which is good as we all needed that to tune ourselves back to competition mode again," said Sharma.

Sharma knows things will be different post- COVID-19 especially with the stringent safety and health protocols but is prepared come what may.

"...I guess it is what it is. It's important to try to stay safe at this point in time until the vaccination comes up," said Sharma.

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