Chowrasia grabs one-stroke lead after 36 holes at Indian Open

Chowrasia, a three-time Indian Open runners-up, was closely followed by Bangladesh's Siddikur Rahman, who turned in a three-under 68, to lie one stroke adrift of the leader.

hidden February 21, 2015 10:55:24 IST
Chowrasia grabs one-stroke lead after 36 holes at Indian Open

New Delhi: Indian golfer SSP Chowrasia produced yet another blemish-free round with a four-under 67 on the second day to break off from the peck and take a one-stroke lead at the halfway stage of the Hero Indian Open here today.

After taming the Delhi Golf Club course with a spotless 66 on the opening day, Chowrasia maintained a clean slate in his second round also, the first time he as been bogey free for consecutive rounds in his career. He is at 10-under 132 after 36 holes.

Chowrasia, a three-time Indian Open runners-up, was closely followed by Bangladesh's Siddikur Rahman, who turned in a three-under 68, to lie one stroke adrift of the leader.

Chowrasia grabs onestroke lead after 36 holes at Indian Open

File photo of SSP Chowrasia. AFP

Thailand's Chapchai Nirat and Joakim Lagergren of Sweden brought home a matching even-par 71 to lie tied third.

American Paul Peterson (68) and Richard Mcevoy (67) of England were tied fifth with a total of five-under 137. World number 39 Anirban Lahiri also lifted himself after a forgettable
opening day yesterday, firing the best-round of the day, a six-under 65 to zoom to tied seventh today.

A two-time European Tour winner, Chowrasia was off the block in style with a birdie in the opening hole. But after that, his putter went cold as he parred the next eight holes.

At the turn, the Kolkata golfer blasted successive birdies at the 10th and 11th holes and then parred next four holes, which included a difficult save at the tricky par-4 14th hole. He moved into the sole lead with a birdie at the 16th hole.

"This is the first time that I have been bogey free for 36 holes. It is not easy. I have played here many times but DGC always remains a tough course. Today's round has been a confidence booster for me. I will like to be aggressive tomorrow as Nirat and Siddikur are also playing well," Chowrasia told reporters.

Asked about his round, Chowrasia said: "I started off well, picking a birdie at the first hole. I was hitting well but my putting was not good. I parred next few holes. I knew I will have my chances in the back nine so I was not worried. The best birdie was the 16th hole. I went into the sole lead after that. It was a satisfying round."

The cut was decided at two-over and among the Indians, Jeev Milkha Singh (72), S Chikkarangappa (75), Mukesh Kumar (73), Amardip Sinh Malik (69), Om Prakash Chouhan (73), Chirag Kumar (74), three-time winner Jyoti Randhawa (69), Manav Jaini (69), Shiv Kapur (69), Angad Cheema (70), Subhankar Sharma (72), Arjun Atwal (70) made the cut.

Lahiri, who won the Maybank Malaysia Open a fortnight ago, said: "I felt positive about my game. I was playing aggressive today. I lost concentration and there was also this pressure of expectation. I hope to play freely in the last two rounds as well."

PTI

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