British Court orders retrial of Hillsborough disaster commander; retrial to begin 7 October

A British judge has ordered retrial of David Duckenfield who was the commander during 1989 FA Cup semi-final at Hillsborough between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest which claimed lives of 96 fans

Agence France-Presse June 25, 2019 17:56:09 IST
British Court orders retrial of Hillsborough disaster commander; retrial to begin 7 October
  • Judge Peter Openshaw ordered retrial of David Duckenfield, who was the match commander of the disastrous FA Cup semi-final at Hillsborough in 1989

  • The retrial is scheduled to begin on 7 October at Preston Crown Court near Liverpool

  • Duckenfield stands accused of being responsible for 95 of the 96 deaths

London: A British court on Tuesday ordered the retrial of the police officer overseeing security during the 1989 Hillsborough football stadium disaster in which 96 Liverpool fans died in a crush.

British Court orders retrial of Hillsborough disaster commander retrial to begin 7 October

David Duckenfield was the Former Chief Superintendent of South Yorkshire Police. Reuters file photo

Match commander David Duckenfield escaped penalty when a jury failed to reach a verdict in April following a 10-week trial.

The 74-year-old's lawyers had opposed an application for a retrial on gross negligence manslaughter charges.

But Judge Peter Openshaw ordered the retrial to begin on 7 October at Preston Crown Court near Liverpool.

"I authorise a retrial of defendant David Duckenfield," he said.

Duckenfield stands accused of being responsible for 95 of the 96 deaths. The last victim died more than a year after the disaster and cannot be legally linked to the case.

The crush of people at the FA Cup semi-final match between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest remains one of the worst sporting disasters in British history.

It led to years of anger and frustration expressed by relatives and team fans alike at an alleged police cover-up and slow prosecution of the case that followed.

Victims' families fought a long campaign for events surrounding the disaster to be re-investigated and the Crown Prosecution Service decided to press charges in June 2017.

The only person convicted in the case was ordered in May to pay a fine of £6,500 ($8,300, 7,300 euros).

Britain's Crown Prosecution Service alleged during the April hearing that Duckenfield had the "ultimate responsibility" for allowing the crush to occur.

But the defence argued the case was "breathtakingly unfair" and said the defendant had "tried to do the right thing".

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