NEET ordinance will end unhealthy practices of private colleges: Venkaiah Naidu

Union Parliamentary Affairs Minister M Venkaiah Naidu said on Tuesday that the NEET ordinance will end unhealthy practices of private colleges.

PTI May 24, 2016 17:16:02 IST
NEET ordinance will end unhealthy practices of private colleges: Venkaiah Naidu

New Delhi: The government is in favour of National Eligibility-cum-Entrance Test (NEET) as it wants to put an end to "unhealthy" practices of private medical colleges, Union Parliamentary Affairs Minister M Venkaiah Naidu said on Tuesday.

"The government is in favour of NEET," he said, adding, "the private colleges, which are practicing unhealthy trends, we have to put an end to those."

He said the issue was raised in Parliament and all political parties expressed the opinion that the students would find it difficult to prepare for the exams in such a short period of time.

NEET ordinance will end unhealthy practices of private colleges Venkaiah Naidu

M Venkaiah Naidu. PTI.

That's why the Cabinet brought an ordinance on NEET keeping out of its ambit State Boards for one year, he said.

Noting that the Ordinance has given a "firm and statutory" support to the common medical entrance test, Naidu said the students in states will get an opportunity to appear this year (2016-17) for undergraduate exams.

The ordinance on NEET, cleared by the Union Cabinet on Friday last, is aimed at "partially" overturning Supreme Court order that had also taken into account the multiple medical entrance tests by states and private colleges as well as allegations of corruption.

The court had directed that a common entrance test--NEET-- will be held across India for MBBS and dental courses.

But state governments had objected to its implementation from this year, saying it will be too stressful for students as they had little time to prepare for the syllabus and also there were issue of language.

They said the students affiliated to state boards will find it tough to appear for the uniform test as early as July and such students will be at a loss compared to those who have followed the central board.

After the Supreme Court turned down the plea, the Centre had decided to take the ordinance route.

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