Tropical Storm Tembin hits Philippines, triggers flooding and landslides in Mindanao island; death toll rises to 200 [Photos]

Some 200 people have been killed in the southern Philippines after a tropical storm battered the archipelago nation's second-largest island, triggering heavy flooding and landslides

FP Staff December 24, 2017 14:11:13 IST
Some 200 people have been killed in southern Philippines after a tropical storm battered the archipelago nation's second-largest island, triggering heavy flooding and landslides. AP
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Some 200 people have been killed in southern Philippines after a tropical storm battered the archipelago nation's second-largest island, triggering heavy flooding and landslides. AP
Tropical Storm Tembin lashed Mindanao island, home to 20 million people, on Friday with gusts of 125 kilometres an hour and torrential rain. AP
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Tropical Storm Tembin lashed Mindanao island, home to 20 million people, on Friday with gusts of 125 kilometres an hour and torrential rain. AP
Police said 144 people remained missing while more than 40,000 had fled to evacuation camps as Tembin roared out into the South China Sea early Sunday. AP
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Police said 144 people remained missing while more than 40,000 had fled to evacuation camps as Tembin roared out into the South China Sea early Sunday. AP
Local police said 135 people were killed and 72 were missing in the northern section of Mindanao, while 47 were dead and 72 missing in the impoverished Zamboanga peninsula on its western side. AP
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Local police said 135 people were killed and 72 were missing in the northern section of Mindanao, while 47 were dead and 72 missing in the impoverished Zamboanga peninsula on its western side. AP
Tembin struck less than a week after Tropical Storm Kai-Tak left scores dead and more than 20 missing in the central Philippines, straining the disaster-prone nation's already stretched resources. AP
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Tembin struck less than a week after Tropical Storm Kai-Tak left scores dead and more than 20 missing in the central Philippines, straining the disaster-prone nation's already stretched resources. AP