Solar eclipse: Space event will provide a great show across USA, weather permitting [Photos]

On Monday, a total solar eclipse will sweep across the United States for the first time in 99 years.

FP Staff August 21, 2017 14:59:47 IST
On Monday, the "Great American Eclipse," as it is being called, will move diagonally across the country, northwest to southeast, providing a spectacular solar show — weather permitting — and an excellent excuse for scores of eclipse-viewing parties and music festivals.
1/4
On Monday, the "Great American Eclipse," as it is being called, will move diagonally across the country, northwest to southeast, providing a spectacular solar show — weather permitting — and an excellent excuse for scores of eclipse-viewing parties and music festivals.
It will first be visible in the northwestern state of Oregon at 9.05 am (16:05 GMT), with totality there coming 75 minutes later. Oregon authorities say they expect a million people to flood into the state for the event, clogging roadways and overflowing campgrounds.
2/4
It will first be visible in the northwestern state of Oregon at 9.05 am (16:05 GMT), with totality there coming 75 minutes later. Oregon authorities say they expect a million people to flood into the state for the event, clogging roadways and overflowing campgrounds.
In all, about 12 million people living in 14 states will be in the path of totality, with many million others able to witness at least a partial eclipse, according to the American Astronomical Society.
3/4
In all, about 12 million people living in 14 states will be in the path of totality, with many million others able to witness at least a partial eclipse, according to the American Astronomical Society.
Space enthusiasts will get to see a wealth of images, both before and after the solar eclipse, captured according to NASA, by “11 spacecrafts and three NASA aircrafts, 50 high-altitude balloons, and astronauts who will be aboard the International Space Station.
4/4
Space enthusiasts will get to see a wealth of images, both before and after the solar eclipse, captured according to NASA, by “11 spacecrafts and three NASA aircrafts, 50 high-altitude balloons, and astronauts who will be aboard the International Space Station.