Bali volcano continues to rage for second day: Authorities scramble to evacuate locals

Indonesia extended the closure of the airport on Bali as ash from a volcano swept the island, stranding thousands of tourists as authorities tried to persuade villagers to leave their homes near the erupting mountain

FP Staff November 28, 2017 16:21:20 IST
Indonesia on Tuesday extended the closure of the airport in Bali for a second day as ash from a volcano swept the island, stranding thousands of tourists. Authorities tried to persuade villagers near the erupting mountain to leave their houses. AP
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Indonesia on Tuesday extended the closure of the airport in Bali for a second day as ash from a volcano swept the island, stranding thousands of tourists. Authorities tried to persuade villagers near the erupting mountain to leave their houses. AP
Frustration at the country's second-busiest airport was starting to boil over, with an estimated 2,000 people attempting to get refunds and reschedule tickets. Bali's Ngurah Rai International Airport airport, about 60 km from the Mount Agung volcano, will be closed until 7 am on Wednesday, aviation navigation authorities said. AP
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Frustration at the country's second-busiest airport was starting to boil over, with an estimated 2,000 people attempting to get refunds and reschedule tickets. Bali's Ngurah Rai International Airport airport, about 60 km from the Mount Agung volcano, will be closed until 7 am on Wednesday, aviation navigation authorities said. AP
Ten alternative airports have been prepared for airlines to divert inbound flights, including in neighbouring provinces, the airport operator said, adding it was helping people make alternative bookings and providing food and entertainment for stranded travellers. Passengers talk to ground crew as their flights are cancelled at Ngurah Rai International Airport. AP
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Ten alternative airports have been prepared for airlines to divert inbound flights, including in neighbouring provinces, the airport operator said, adding it was helping people make alternative bookings and providing food and entertainment for stranded travellers. Passengers talk to ground crew as their flights are cancelled at Ngurah Rai International Airport. AP
On Tuesday, life was going on largely as normal in villages surrounding Agung, with residents offering prayers as the volcano sent columns of ash and smoke into the sky. A statue on a bridge is seen as Mount Agung volcano erupts in the background. Reuters
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On Tuesday, life was going on largely as normal in villages surrounding Agung, with residents offering prayers as the volcano sent columns of ash and smoke into the sky. A statue on a bridge is seen as Mount Agung volcano erupts in the background. Reuters
Some villagers who fled in September, when the alert was last raised to the highest level, have gone home despite government warnings. On Monday, authorities said 1,00,000 residents living near the volcano had been ordered to get out of an 8-10 km exclusion zone, warning a larger eruption was "imminent". AP
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Some villagers who fled in September, when the alert was last raised to the highest level, have gone home despite government warnings. On Monday, authorities said 1,00,000 residents living near the volcano had been ordered to get out of an 8-10 km exclusion zone, warning a larger eruption was "imminent". AP
While the population in the area has been estimated at between 63,000 and 1,40,000, just over 29,000 people were registered at emergency centres, said Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, a spokesman for the Disaster Mitigation Agency. School students stand on a truck as their transport to go to school with the Mount Agung volcano spews smoke and ash. AP
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While the population in the area has been estimated at between 63,000 and 1,40,000, just over 29,000 people were registered at emergency centres, said Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, a spokesman for the Disaster Mitigation Agency. School students stand on a truck as their transport to go to school with the Mount Agung volcano spews smoke and ash. AP
Indonesia’s Volcanology and Geological Disaster Mitigation Centre has warned that an eruption of a size similar to that seen in 1963 could send rocks bigger than a fist flying a distance of up to 8 km, and volcanic gas a distance of 10 km within three minutes. A view of Mount Agung volcano on Monday. AP
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Indonesia’s Volcanology and Geological Disaster Mitigation Centre has warned that an eruption of a size similar to that seen in 1963 could send rocks bigger than a fist flying a distance of up to 8 km, and volcanic gas a distance of 10 km within three minutes. A view of Mount Agung volcano on Monday. AP