75 years after liberation, site of Auschwitz's concentration camps opens doors to survivor families [Photos]

On 27 January 1945, the Soviet Red Army liberated the Auschwitz death camp in German-occupied Poland. To mark its 75 years, many survivors from across the world were scheduled to travel to this site for official anniversary commemorations.

The Associated Press January 29, 2020 15:39:32 IST
On 27 January 1945, the Soviet Red Army liberated the Auschwitz death camp in German-occupied Poland. To mark its 75 years, many survivors from across the world were scheduled to travel to this site for official anniversary commemorations. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
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On 27 January 1945, the Soviet Red Army liberated the Auschwitz death camp in German-occupied Poland. To mark its 75 years, many survivors from across the world were scheduled to travel to this site for official anniversary commemorations. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
The main entrance of the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz in Oswiecim, Poland, which became a leading symbol of the terror of the Holocaust. Inscribed on the gates are the words, 'Arbeit Macht Frei', which can be translated into English as, 'Work will set you Free.' The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
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The main entrance of the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz in Oswiecim, Poland, which became a leading symbol of the terror of the Holocaust. Inscribed on the gates are the words, 'Arbeit Macht Frei', which can be translated into English as, 'Work will set you Free.' The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
The remains of a gas chamber and crematorium at the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau or Auschwitz II. Soviet troops found the remains of the gas chambers and crematoria that the Germans had blown up before fleeing in an attempt to hide the evidence of their mass killings. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
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The remains of a gas chamber and crematorium at the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau or Auschwitz II. Soviet troops found the remains of the gas chambers and crematoria that the Germans had blown up before fleeing in an attempt to hide the evidence of their mass killings. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
A view inside gas chamber one at the death camp of Auschwitz I Poland. More than 1.1 million people were murdered during the mass killings at Auschwitz. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
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A view inside gas chamber one at the death camp of Auschwitz I Poland. More than 1.1 million people were murdered during the mass killings at Auschwitz. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
View of a wall inside gas chamber one at Auschwitz I. This camp was built in an abandoned Polish military base while Auschwitz II, or Birkenau, a much bigger complex went up later, about three kilometres away. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
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View of a wall inside gas chamber one at Auschwitz I. This camp was built in an abandoned Polish military base while Auschwitz II, or Birkenau, a much bigger complex went up later, about three kilometres away. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
The crematorium near gas chamber one at the Auschwitz I camp in Poland. Nazis selected prisoners who could be used as forced labour while many elderly people, women and babies were gassed to death soon after their arrival. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
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The crematorium near gas chamber one at the Auschwitz I camp in Poland. Nazis selected prisoners who could be used as forced labour while many elderly people, women and babies were gassed to death soon after their arrival. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
A pathway leading to an observation and security tower between what were electric barbed wire fences inside the concentration camp, Auschwitz I. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
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A pathway leading to an observation and security tower between what were electric barbed wire fences inside the concentration camp, Auschwitz I. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
A view inside a prisoner barracks in the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz Birkenau or Auschwitz II in Oswiecim, Poland. Prisoners were brought to the concentration camp in cramped, window-less cattle trains. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
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A view inside a prisoner barracks in the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz Birkenau or Auschwitz II in Oswiecim, Poland. Prisoners were brought to the concentration camp in cramped, window-less cattle trains. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
The remains of the brick stone chimneys of prisoner barracks can be seen inside the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz Birkenau or Auschwitz II. Most of the victims of the killings were Jews but also included Poles, Roma and Soviet prisoners of war among others. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
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The remains of the brick stone chimneys of prisoner barracks can be seen inside the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz Birkenau or Auschwitz II. Most of the victims of the killings were Jews but also included Poles, Roma and Soviet prisoners of war among others. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
A wagon stands on the railway tracks from where hundred thousands of people were directed to the gas chambers to be murdered at the Auschwitz Birkenau or Auschwitz II concentration camp. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
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A wagon stands on the railway tracks from where hundred thousands of people were directed to the gas chambers to be murdered at the Auschwitz Birkenau or Auschwitz II concentration camp. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
While all that is visible of the prisoner barracks are the remains of the brick stone chimneys, what lie intact 75 years on are the rail tracks and watchtowers and some of the barracks where prisoners slept in cold, cramped conditions. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber
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While all that is visible of the prisoner barracks are the remains of the brick stone chimneys, what lie intact 75 years on are the rail tracks and watchtowers and some of the barracks where prisoners slept in cold, cramped conditions. The Associated Press/ Markus Schreiber