Rohingya refugees find respite in Bangladesh's fishing industry; take up jobs in boats, yards [Photos]

Rohingya Muslims driven out of Myanmar have found a way to survive in neighbouring Bangladesh — by taking up jobs in the fishing industry

FP Staff June 14, 2018 15:39:32 IST
The 7,00,000 Rohingya refugees who fled from Myanmar are finding new livelihoods in Bangladesh's fishing industry, all under the official radar. Reuters/Clodagh Kilcoyne
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The 7,00,000 Rohingya refugees who fled from Myanmar are finding new livelihoods in Bangladesh's fishing industry, all under the official radar. Reuters/Clodagh Kilcoyne
The Shamlapur refugee camp in the southern district of Cox's Bazar is home to about 10,000 Rohingya refugees. Others have settled in similar camps across the district. Reuters/Clodagh Kilcoyne
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The Shamlapur refugee camp in the southern district of Cox's Bazar is home to about 10,000 Rohingya refugees. Others have settled in similar camps across the district. Reuters/Clodagh Kilcoyne
Although the refugees cannot work legally, some find jobs on fishing boats or help push them out to sea. Others in the camp earn money by shattering ice blocks to preserve the catch from the heat, mending nets or repairing boats. Reuters/Coldagh Kilcoyne
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Although the refugees cannot work legally, some find jobs on fishing boats or help push them out to sea. Others in the camp earn money by shattering ice blocks to preserve the catch from the heat, mending nets or repairing boats. Reuters/Coldagh Kilcoyne
The women have found work drying fish at a yard in nearby Nazirartek, for a daily takehome of 100-200 taka ($1.20-$2.40). Reuters/Coldagh Kilcoyne
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The women have found work drying fish at a yard in nearby Nazirartek, for a daily takehome of 100-200 taka ($1.20-$2.40). Reuters/Coldagh Kilcoyne
Even the children contribute to the community. From dawn, they push boats into the water, or join fishing trips to earn a small bag of fish that they can swap for tamarind. Reuters/Coldagh Kilcoyne
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Even the children contribute to the community. From dawn, they push boats into the water, or join fishing trips to earn a small bag of fish that they can swap for tamarind. Reuters/Coldagh Kilcoyne
With a future set in the neighbouring Bangladesh, the Rohingya Muslims are slowly adapting to their new lives. Reuters/Coldagh Kilcoyne.
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With a future set in the neighbouring Bangladesh, the Rohingya Muslims are slowly adapting to their new lives. Reuters/Coldagh Kilcoyne.