Photos: Francois Englert and Peter Higgs win 2013 Nobel in Physics [Photos]

Britain's Peter Higgs and Francois Englert of Belgium, won the Nobel Prize for physics on Tuesday for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson particle.

FP Staff October 09, 2013 09:59:15 IST
A picture Francois Englert of Belgium and Britain's Peter Higgs, laureates of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics, are displayed on a screen during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm 8 October, 2013. Higgs and Englert won the Nobel Prize for physics on Tuesday for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson particle that explains how elementary matter attained the mass to form stars and planets. Erik Martensson/TT News Agency/Reuters
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A picture Francois Englert of Belgium and Britain's Peter Higgs, laureates of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics, are displayed on a screen during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm 8 October, 2013. Higgs and Englert won the Nobel Prize for physics on Tuesday for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson particle that explains how elementary matter attained the mass to form stars and planets. Erik Martensson/TT News Agency/Reuters
Chairman Gunnar Ingelman, permanent secretary Staffan Normark and board member Olga Botner (L-R) of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announce the laureates of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the academy in Stockhol. Erik Martensson/TT News Agency/Reuters
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Chairman Gunnar Ingelman, permanent secretary Staffan Normark and board member Olga Botner (L-R) of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announce the laureates of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics during a news conference at the academy in Stockhol. Erik Martensson/TT News Agency/Reuters
British physicist Peter Higgs (R) talks with Belgium physicist Francois Englert before a news conference update in the search for the Higgs boson at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin near Geneva 4 July, 2012. Denis Balibouse/Reuters
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British physicist Peter Higgs (R) talks with Belgium physicist Francois Englert before a news conference update in the search for the Higgs boson at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin near Geneva 4 July, 2012. Denis Balibouse/Reuters
Belgian physicist Francois Englert reacts next to his wife Mira as they appear at the balcony of his house in Brussels after he and Britain's Peter Higgs won the 2013 Nobel prize for physics. Yves Herman/Reuters
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Belgian physicist Francois Englert reacts next to his wife Mira as they appear at the balcony of his house in Brussels after he and Britain's Peter Higgs won the 2013 Nobel prize for physics. Yves Herman/Reuters
Portraits of winners of the 2013 Nobel prize for medicine or physiology, James Rothman, Randy Schekman and Thomas Suedhof (L-R), are displayed on a screen at the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Two Americans, Rothman and Schekman, and Germany's Sudhof won the prize for research into how the cell organises its transport system, the award-giving body said on Monday. Janerik Henriksson/TT News Agency/Reuters
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Portraits of winners of the 2013 Nobel prize for medicine or physiology, James Rothman, Randy Schekman and Thomas Suedhof (L-R), are displayed on a screen at the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Two Americans, Rothman and Schekman, and Germany's Sudhof won the prize for research into how the cell organises its transport system, the award-giving body said on Monday. Janerik Henriksson/TT News Agency/Reuters
Randy Schekman (L), professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, holds a parking permit for Nobel laureate given by chancellor Nicholas B Dirks after a news conference in Berkeley, California. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Stephen Lam/Reuters
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Randy Schekman (L), professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, holds a parking permit for Nobel laureate given by chancellor Nicholas B Dirks after a news conference in Berkeley, California. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Stephen Lam/Reuters
Photos of Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel, the three laureates of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Chemistry, is seen on a screen during the announcement of the winners at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm October 9, 2013. Karplus, Levitt and Warshel won the 2013 Nobel Prize for chemistry for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, the award-giving body said on Wednesday. REUTERS/Claudio Bresciani/TT News Agency
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Photos of Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel, the three laureates of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Chemistry, is seen on a screen during the announcement of the winners at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm October 9, 2013. Karplus, Levitt and Warshel won the 2013 Nobel Prize for chemistry for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, the award-giving body said on Wednesday. REUTERS/Claudio Bresciani/TT News Agency
University of Southern California professor Arieh Warshel (L) talks on the phone with Israeli President Shimon Peres as he sits with his wife Tami Warshel after hearing he won the Nobel chemistry prize in Los Angeles, California October 9, 2013. Warshel, a U.S. and Israel citizen, won the Nobel chemistry prize with U.S. scientists Martin Karplus and Michael Levitt on Wednesday for pioneering work on computer programs that simulate complex chemical processes and have revolutionised research in areas from drugs to solar energy. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, awarding the prize of 8 million crowns ($1.25 million) to Karplus, Levitt and Warshel, said their work had effectively taken chemistry into cyberspace. Long gone were the days of modelling reactions using plastic balls and sticks. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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University of Southern California professor Arieh Warshel (L) talks on the phone with Israeli President Shimon Peres as he sits with his wife Tami Warshel after hearing he won the Nobel chemistry prize in Los Angeles, California October 9, 2013. Warshel, a U.S. and Israel citizen, won the Nobel chemistry prize with U.S. scientists Martin Karplus and Michael Levitt on Wednesday for pioneering work on computer programs that simulate complex chemical processes and have revolutionised research in areas from drugs to solar energy. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, awarding the prize of 8 million crowns ($1.25 million) to Karplus, Levitt and Warshel, said their work had effectively taken chemistry into cyberspace. Long gone were the days of modelling reactions using plastic balls and sticks. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson