India welcomes the festive season as states celebrate Makar Sankranti, Bihu, Pongal and Lohri [Photos]

Over a million pilgrims from across India and abroad took a holy dip in the river Ganges at the annual Ganga Sagar Fair on Makar Sankranti

FP Staff January 14, 2018 10:23:22 IST
Makar Sankranti is celebrated in various parts of the Indian subcontinent to observe the day which marks the shift of the sun into ever-lengthening days. PTI
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Makar Sankranti is celebrated in various parts of the Indian subcontinent to observe the day which marks the shift of the sun into ever-lengthening days. PTI
The festival is a harvest festival and is celebrated throughout India, from north to south and east to west. Makar Sankranti is most popular in western India, whereas down south, the festival is known as Pongal and in the north, it is celebrated as Lohri. PTI
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The festival is a harvest festival and is celebrated throughout India, from north to south and east to west. Makar Sankranti is most popular in western India, whereas down south, the festival is known as Pongal and in the north, it is celebrated as Lohri. PTI
Makar Sankranti is celebrated across India in different ways and every state celebrates and welcomes the new season of harvest in their own indigenous manner. PTI
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Makar Sankranti is celebrated across India in different ways and every state celebrates and welcomes the new season of harvest in their own indigenous manner. PTI
Pongal is celebrated four days from the last day of the Tamil month Maargazhi to the third day of the Tamil month Thai. PTI
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Pongal is celebrated four days from the last day of the Tamil month Maargazhi to the third day of the Tamil month Thai. PTI
In Assam, the Magh Bihu — also called Bhogali Bihu — marks the end of harvesting season in the month of Maagha (January–February). It is the Assamese celebration of Sankranti, with feasting lasting for a week. PTI
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In Assam, the Magh Bihu — also called Bhogali Bihu — marks the end of harvesting season in the month of Maagha (January–February). It is the Assamese celebration of Sankranti, with feasting lasting for a week. PTI
The festival is marked by feasts and bonfires. Young people erect makeshift huts, known as meji, from bamboo, leaves and thatch, in which they eat the food prepared for the feast, and then burn the huts the next morning. PTI
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The festival is marked by feasts and bonfires. Young people erect makeshift huts, known as meji, from bamboo, leaves and thatch, in which they eat the food prepared for the feast, and then burn the huts the next morning. PTI
Delhi and Haryana and many neighbouring states also consider Sakraat or Sankranti to be a main festival of the year. PTI
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Delhi and Haryana and many neighbouring states also consider Sakraat or Sankranti to be a main festival of the year. PTI