Celebrating Hadrian's Wall in Northern England, which stands tall even after 1900 years

The 73-mile structure from Tyneside to the Solway Firth, the northern boundary of the Roman empire, was constructed between 122 and 130 AD. Various events have been organised through the year to mark this special anniversary

FP Staff January 21, 2022 14:40:18 IST
Hadrian’s Wall, stretching across 73 miles, once marked the extent of the Roman empire in Britannia. Now it’s a pitstop on the way to Scotland’s capital, Edinburgh, or the country’s largest city, Glasgow. This year marks the 1900 anniversary of the start of the construction of Hadrian's Wall, which was built to guard the northern frontier of the Roman Empire in 122 AD. Running from Solway Firth to Wallsend on the River Tyne, this construction is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site. AFP
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Hadrian’s Wall, stretching across 73 miles, once marked the extent of the Roman empire in Britannia. Now it’s a pitstop on the way to Scotland’s capital, Edinburgh, or the country’s largest city, Glasgow. This year marks the 1900 anniversary of the start of the construction of Hadrian's Wall, which was built to guard the northern frontier of the Roman Empire in 122 AD. Running from Solway Firth to Wallsend on the River Tyne, this construction is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site. AFP
Emperor Hadrian (ruled 117–138 CE) went to Britain in 122 and, in the words of his biographer, “was the first to build a wall, 80 miles long, to separate the Romans from the barbarians.” The initial construction of the wall took approximately six years, and expansions were later made. On Hadrian’s death, his successor Antoninus Pius (138–161) decided to extend the Roman dominion northward by building a new wall in Scotland. The resulting Antonine Wall stretched for 37 miles (59 km) along the narrow isthmus between the estuaries of the Rivers Forth and Clyde. Within two decades, however, the Antonine Wall was abandoned in favour of Hadrian’s Wall, which continued in use nearly until the end of Roman rule in Britain (410). AFP
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Emperor Hadrian (ruled 117–138 CE) went to Britain in 122 and, in the words of his biographer, “was the first to build a wall, 80 miles long, to separate the Romans from the barbarians.” The initial construction of the wall took approximately six years, and expansions were later made. On Hadrian’s death, his successor Antoninus Pius (138–161) decided to extend the Roman dominion northward by building a new wall in Scotland. The resulting Antonine Wall stretched for 37 miles (59 km) along the narrow isthmus between the estuaries of the Rivers Forth and Clyde. Within two decades, however, the Antonine Wall was abandoned in favour of Hadrian’s Wall, which continued in use nearly until the end of Roman rule in Britain (410). AFP
In 1987 Hadrian’s Wall was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. Over the centuries many sections of the wall have suffered damage caused by roads traversing it and by the plunder of its stones to build nearby houses and other structures. However, the remaining foundations and forts attract tourists from throughout the world. AFP
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In 1987 Hadrian’s Wall was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. Over the centuries many sections of the wall have suffered damage caused by roads traversing it and by the plunder of its stones to build nearby houses and other structures. However, the remaining foundations and forts attract tourists from throughout the world. AFP
Soldiers toiled for a decade or so, piling stone upon stone until it stretched from coast to coast, across the very top of what’s now northern England: a distance of 118 kilometres. The wall stood up to 4.6 metres high (15 feet) with walls 3 metres wide (9.8 feet). It bristled with towers, forts and watch posts, called milecastles, and gave commanding views of the surrounding countryside. AFP
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Soldiers toiled for a decade or so, piling stone upon stone until it stretched from coast to coast, across the very top of what’s now northern England: a distance of 118 kilometres. The wall stood up to 4.6 metres high (15 feet) with walls 3 metres wide (9.8 feet). It bristled with towers, forts and watch posts, called milecastles, and gave commanding views of the surrounding countryside. AFP
The wall’s most popular attraction, the sprawling hillside complex of Housesteads Roman Fort, sees some 100,000 visitors per year. AFP
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The wall’s most popular attraction, the sprawling hillside complex of Housesteads Roman Fort, sees some 100,000 visitors per year. AFP
The Hadrian Wall is often compared to The Great Wall of China. In fact, in 2018, the organisations which manage the Great Wall of China and Hadrian's Wall signed an agreement to collaborate for the growth of tourism and for historical and cultural understanding of the monuments. AFP
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The Hadrian Wall is often compared to The Great Wall of China. In fact, in 2018, the organisations which manage the Great Wall of China and Hadrian's Wall signed an agreement to collaborate for the growth of tourism and for historical and cultural understanding of the monuments. AFP