Bathukamma celebrations: From simple village festival to Telangana's 'Mardi Gras' [Photos]

Bathukamma has been always an integral part of the cultural ethos of Telangana

FP Staff December 16, 2017 10:30:51 IST
Bathukamma has been always an integral part of the cultural ethos of Telangana. Photo courtesy Myasa Balu
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Bathukamma has been always an integral part of the cultural ethos of Telangana. Photo courtesy Myasa Balu
Celebrated with much fanfare for nine days starting from the mahalaya amavasya before Dussehra, Bathukamma (Bathuku meaning life, amma meaning mother) is a floral arrangement which is worshipped as a goddess. Photo courtesy Myasa Balu
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Celebrated with much fanfare for nine days starting from the mahalaya amavasya before Dussehra, Bathukamma (Bathuku meaning life, amma meaning mother) is a floral arrangement which is worshipped as a goddess. Photo courtesy Myasa Balu
Made by the women of the house on a brass plate, flowers of different colors are arranged on top of each other in a conical arrangement, gradually decreasing in size. Atop the mound is a small cone of turmeric representing the Goddess Gowri. Photo courtesy Myasa Balu
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Made by the women of the house on a brass plate, flowers of different colors are arranged on top of each other in a conical arrangement, gradually decreasing in size. Atop the mound is a small cone of turmeric representing the Goddess Gowri. Photo courtesy Myasa Balu
This arrangement resembling a temple gopuram is then placed before the family goddess and prayers are offered. Photo courtesy Myasa Balu
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This arrangement resembling a temple gopuram is then placed before the family goddess and prayers are offered. Photo courtesy Myasa Balu
In the evenings, women deck up in finery, congregate at one point (village squares or Temples in olden days) and encircle it. Singing songs and clapping their hands in unison (akin to the garba) they pray for peace and prosperity. Photo courtesy Myasa Balu
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In the evenings, women deck up in finery, congregate at one point (village squares or Temples in olden days) and encircle it. Singing songs and clapping their hands in unison (akin to the garba) they pray for peace and prosperity. Photo courtesy Myasa Balu