Watch: A deep dive into the machismo-driven world of greyhound racing in Punjab

Greyhound racing involves a big investment in terms of both time and money, and men in Punjab take a special interest to ensure that their dogs win | #FirstCulture

FP Staff February 27, 2018 19:08:14 IST
Watch: A deep dive into the machismo-driven world of greyhound racing in Punjab

Track lines are being drawn, trophies shine in the sunlight and chicken curry is being stirred in a vat — a town in Punjab is preparing for a race, but humans won't be competing in it.

Fierce, growling greyhounds who have racing "in their blood" regularly take part in the sport in this northern state, as 101 India has showcased in this video. It takes one look of the faces of their owners to know just how proud they are of these dogs.

Watch A deep dive into the machismodriven world of greyhound racing in Punjab

These revered greyhounds are fed a diet of protein-rich food, including fat and eggs. Youtube screengrab

Doctor VC, who has previously explored stories such as that of the Ramgarh gaurakshaks and the dacoits of Chambal, talks about how this racing is a matter of honour for some young men in the state. In fact, they even call themselves shikaris.

One of the dog owners, Jugnu, may smile at the camera while brandishing his gun, but you see a contrasting expression when he is petting his greyhound. Though this breed of dog is quite lean, they can run at speeds of 60 kilometres per hour, and special tracks are created for them in the fields, where they can practice.

The sport is not a modern invention — greyhound racing has been in vogue since the British Raj, when the dogs would chase after rabbits. A ban was imposed on the practice, but racing enthusiasts found a way around it, by using a mechanical lure that moves along the track, which is covered in rabbit skin.

These dogs are fed a diet of protein-rich food, including fat and eggs. Many of these dogs have their own quarters, complete with lights and a fan, and are given oil massages. So invested are people in the sport, that groups such as the 'Hunter Brothers' buy greyhounds abroad and bring them back to train as race dogs. One of the 'shikaris' interviewed went so far as to say that they spend more time with the dogs than with their own children.

The future of the sport is largely dependent on the ability to import greyhounds, since it is discouraged abroad. There's also the obvious question of ethics and whether these dogs are being ill-treated to feed a curiosity and interest which is human.

You can watch the video set to the tunes of 'Jutt Blues' here.

Updated Date:

Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets. Get technology news, gadgets reviews & ratings. Popular gadgets including laptop, tablet and mobile specifications, features, prices, comparison.

also read

Hamlet, Shakespeare's greatest villain: A charismatic manipulator who persuaded the world of his heroic nature
Arts & Culture

Hamlet, Shakespeare's greatest villain: A charismatic manipulator who persuaded the world of his heroic nature

Hamlet is a self-centred, entitled, manipulative, callous bully. However, he is also intensely charismatic, so much so that he has persuaded the world to share his Hamlet-centric view. That is what makes him a villain of genius.

Punjab wastes chance to frame path-breaking farm laws; neglects ancillary workers, protects land holding farmers
India

Punjab wastes chance to frame path-breaking farm laws; neglects ancillary workers, protects land holding farmers

In a quest to oppose what the state considers as Centre's hegemony, Punjab brings out three farm bills but crippled with bureaucratic clog and little creativity.

Punjab Assembly passes four bills to counter Centre's farm laws, adopts resolution
Politics

Punjab Assembly passes four bills to counter Centre's farm laws, adopts resolution

The bills provide for imprisonment of not less than three years for the sale or purchase of wheat or paddy below MSP, seek to prevent hoarding and black-marketing of agricultural produce, and to exempt farmers from the attachment of land up to 2.5 acres.