Under the Banyan Tree on A Full Moon Night: April edition of Delhi event celebrates folk music

Under the Banyan Tree on A Full Moon Night's April edition will feature performances by the Sufi singer Mooralala Marwada followed by the neo-folk fusion band, Neeraj Arya's Kabir Café.

FP Staff April 19, 2019 18:38:27 IST
Under the Banyan Tree on A Full Moon Night: April edition of Delhi event celebrates folk music
  • Under the Banyan Tree on A Full Moon Night's April edition will feature performances by the Sufi singer Mooralala Marwada followed by the neo-folk fusion band, Neeraj Arya's Kabir Café.

  • The event will be held on 20 April at 1AQ opposite the Qutub Minar, Mehrauli.

  • The concert series has been conceptualised by Anubhav Nath and is produced by Friends of Music, an initiative by the entertainment company - Teamwork Arts.

Under the Banyan Tree on A Full Moon Night, conceptualised as a monthly tradition of celebrating and enjoying music with friends and family in an intimate Baithak-style setting, is all set to return with its April edition exploring the various sounds and styles of Indian folk music.

On 20 April, the audiences at the event will witness a range of styles of folk music, which in turn also bears the signature of the places it originates from. Folk music in some cultures is a very intimate form of expression, in others, it is the heart of a community's shared history. Folk music, especially today, serves to bridge the past and present.

Under the Banyan Tree on A Full Moon Night April edition of Delhi event celebrates folk music

Mooralala Marwada (left); Neeraj Arya's Kabir Café. Images via Facebook

Under the Banyan Tree on A Full Moon Night's April edition will feature performances by the Sufi singer Mooralala Marwada followed by the neo-folk fusion band, Neeraj Arya's Kabir Café.

Marwada hails from a long line of Meghwal singers of Janana village in Gujarat's Kutch district. His musical repertoire comprises the poetry of Sufi and Bhakti saints like Kabir, Mirabai, Ravidas and others. Neeraj Arya's Kabir Café is known for fusing Kabir's poetry in a substrate of Indian folk music, mixed with Rock, Reggae, Pop and Carnatic music. With several performances in India and abroad under their name, this fusion band — with Neeraj Arya on lead vocals and guitar, Mukund Ramaswamy on violin, Viren Solanki on percussion and Poubuanpou Britto KC on bass — has also collaborated on Bollywood movies like Hindi Medium and Baadshaho.

Read — Under the Banyan Tree on a Full Moon Night: An unusual cultural evening is a reminder of how lovely Delhi can be

Under the Banyan Tree on a Full Moon Night has been conceptualised by Anubhav Nath and is produced by Friends of Music, an initiative by the entertainment company Teamwork Arts. The concert series brings together musicians and discerning audiences in a community to explore, create and enjoy new sounds under the tranquil repose of a banyan tree with minarets of the iconic Qutub Minar as the backdrop.

Under the Banyan Tree on A Full Moon Night will be held on 20 April at 1AQ opposite the Qutub Minar, Mehrauli.

Updated Date:

also read

How do you write an Anthony Bourdain book without Anthony Bourdain? Laurie Woolever tries, with 'World Travel'
Arts & Culture

How do you write an Anthony Bourdain book without Anthony Bourdain? Laurie Woolever tries, with 'World Travel'

Almost three years after his death, and after a pandemic that almost completely shut down international travel, Ecco will publish World Travel: An Irreverent Guide by Bourdain and his longtime assistant Woolever.

As Chanel No 5 completes 100 years, a look at the iconic fragrance's journey so far
Arts & Culture

As Chanel No 5 completes 100 years, a look at the iconic fragrance's journey so far

An iconic brand has five key elements: it is aspirational, with strong visual identity and persona, it is omnipresent throughout society, and consumers feel a personal connection with it. Chanel No 5 ticks all these boxes.

Edinburgh's renowned festivals, including Fringe, plan hybrid format returns in August after a pandemic year
Arts & Culture

Edinburgh's renowned festivals, including Fringe, plan hybrid format returns in August after a pandemic year

Coronavirus cases have fallen rapidly in Scotland this spring, thanks to an extended lockdown and a strong vaccination programme. But many restrictions are still in place, including on cultural life.