Scientists in UK create self-assembling anti-cancer molecules

Researchers have developed a simple and versatile method for making artificial anti-cancer molecules that mimic the properties of one of the body's natural defence systems.

hidden August 04, 2014 13:44:45 IST
Scientists in UK create self-assembling anti-cancer molecules

London: Researchers have developed a simple and versatile method for making artificial anti-cancer molecules that mimic the properties of one of the body's natural defence systems. The researchers, led by Professor Peter Scott at the University of Warwick, UK, have been able to produce molecules that have a similar structure to peptides which are naturally produced in the body to fight cancer and infection.

The molecules produced in the research have proved effective against colon cancer cells in laboratory tests, in collaboration with Roger Phillips at the Institute for Cancer Therapeutics, Bradford, UK. Artificial peptides had previously been difficult and prohibitively expensive to manufacture in large quantities, but the new process takes only minutes and does not require costly equipment.

Also, traditional peptides that are administered as drugs are quickly neutralised by the body's biochemical defences before they can do their job. A form of complex chemical self-assembly, the new method addresses these problems by being both practical and producing very stable molecules. The new peptide mimics, called triplexes, have a similar 3D helix form to natural peptides.

"The chemistry involved is like throwing Lego blocks into a bag, giving them a shake, and finding that you made a model of the Death Star," said Scott.

Scientists in UK create selfassembling anticancer molecules

Balloons with the pink ribbon, which is used to spread awareness about breast cancer. Image for representational purposes only. Reuters

"The design to achieve that takes some thought and computing power, but once you've worked it out the method can be used to make a lot of complicated molecular objects," Scott said.

Describing the self-assembly process behind the artificial peptides Scott said: "When the organic chemicals involved, an amino alcohol derivative and a picoline, are mixed with iron chloride in a solvent, such as water or methanol, they form strong bonds and are designed to naturally fold together in minutes to form a helix. It's all thermodynamically downhill. The assembly instructions are encoded in the chemicals themselves."

"Once the solvent has been removed we are left with the peptide mimics in the form of crystals," said Scott. "There are no complicated separations to do, and unlike a Lego model kit there are no mysterious bits left over. In practical terms, the chemistry is pretty conventional, Scott said.

The research was published in the journal Nature Chemistry.

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