Books of the week: From Perumal Murugan's Rising Heat to John Bolton’s The Room Where It Happened, our picks

Our weekly roundup of books that should be on your radar.

Aarushi Agrawal June 28, 2020 09:38:20 IST
Books of the week: From Perumal Murugan's Rising Heat to John Bolton’s The Room Where It Happened, our picks

We love stories, and even in the age of Netflix-and-chill, there's nothing like a good book that promises a couple of hours of absorption — whether curled up in bed, in your favourite coffeehouse, or that long (and tiresome) commute to work. Every Sunday, we'll have a succinct pick of books, across diverse genres, that have been newly made available for your reading pleasure. Get them wherever you get your books — the friendly neighbourhood bookseller, e-retail website, chain store — and in whatever form you prefer. Happy reading!

For more of our weekly book recommendations, click here.

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– FICTION

Rising Heat
By Perumal Murugan; translated by Janani Kannan
Penguin Random House India | Rs 399 | 320 pages

Critically acclaimed Tamil author Perumal Murugan’s debut novel has been translated into English for the first time, by Janani Kannan. It follows the life of Selvan, whose ancestral family land has been sold to construct a housing colony, and his family forced to move into much smaller lodgings. In the following years, Selvan observes dramatic shifts in his family, as the pressure of the situation leads to greed and jealousy in them, which threatens to overshadow their lives.

Read more about the book here.

Murder in Shimla
By Bulbul Sharma
Speaking Tiger | Rs 399 | 304 pages

Writer and artist Bulbul Sharma’s book is a murder mystery set in Shimla during the height of World War II. An uninvited guest has arrived at a dinner party at the Assistant Deputy Commissioner’s house, and is found dead in her bed the next morning. As inspector Ram Sen, aided by Mrs Tweedy, investigates the line-up of suspects, he is led to a world of drug dealers, opium addicts, spies, and assassins.

Read more about the book here.

To Kill A Man
By Sam Bourne
Hachette India | Rs 399 | 400 pages

Journalist and writer Sam Bourne’s (pseudonym) thriller follows Natasha Winthrop, a rising star in American politics, seen as a strong future candidate for president. One night, she’s violently assaulted in her home by an intruder. She defends herself and soon, the intruder lies dead. As Winthrop is hailed as a #MeToo heroine, inconsistencies in her story start to emerge. Meanwhile, as Maggie Costello starts investigating, she finds intriguing gaps, especially in Winthrop’s early life.

Read more about the book here.

– MEMOIRS and BIOGRAPHIES

The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir
By John Bolton
Simon & Schuster India | Rs 899 | 592 pages

President Donald Trump’s former National Security Advisor John Bolton's White House memoir offers a comprehensive view of the Trump Administration. He describes a President whose primary concern was getting re-elected, who is addicted to chaos, embraced enemies and spurned friends, and who was deeply suspicious of his own government. He details all the turmoil, conflict, and ego clashes he had to meander and the constant work he did.

Read more about the book here.

– NON-FICTION

Why Men Rape
By Tara Kaushal
HarperCollins | Rs 399 | 326 pages

Writer Tara Kaushal’s book is a detailed undercover investigation to understand the reasons behind rape through interviews with nine men who are inclined to commit acts of sexual violence. These include a doctor who raped his 12-year-old patient, an unemployed youth who killed his former lover, and a serial gang rapist who doesn’t believe rape exists, among others. The book also brings together insights from survivors, experts, and more.

Read more about the book here.

– YOUNG ADULTS

Goner
By Tazmeen Amna
Penguin Random House India | Rs 299 | 248 pages

Writer Tazmeen Amna’s book follows a young woman in her mid-twenties, trying to juggle the dark and intoxicating side of life, memories of an abusive ex-boyfriend, remains of a broken family, and mental health issues. All of it eventually leads to a medical emergency as she overdoses, and ends up with a broken leg. With no job, a failing art career, and a tendency to self-sabotage, will she be able to recover and make her way through some difficult truths?

Read more about the book here.

– YOUNG READERS

How the Onion Got Its Layers
By Sudha Murty
Penguin Random House India | Rs 199 | 44 pages

Award-winning author and Infosys Foundation chairperson Sudha Murty’s latest children’s book answers questions about onions, from why it has so many layers to why one notices one’s mother’s eyes water as she cuts it. The book features illustrations by Priyanka Pachpande.

Read more about the book here.

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