Twitter celebrates victory for freedom of expression: Section 66A deemed 'unconstitutional'

The Supreme Court on Tuesday struck down Section 66A of the Information & Technology Act today after several petitions were raised against it.

FP Staff March 24, 2015 11:04:49 IST
Twitter celebrates victory for freedom of expression: Section 66A deemed 'unconstitutional'
Twitter celebrates victory for freedom of expression Section 66A deemed unconstitutional

Supreme Court of India. Reuters

The Supreme Court on Tuesday struck down Section 66A of the Information & Technology Act today after several petitions were raised against it. The controversial section was specifically in the news for its vague implications on social media and how people use free speech online.

It all began on social media as well. When two girls were arrested for posting comments opposing the Mumbai shutdown for the funeral of Bal Thackeray, there was immense outrage against "draconian" cyber laws and a failure of freedom of speech.

Meanwhile, twitter has been celebrating.

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