Supreme Court seeks details of Haj aspirants who have applied five times without success

The Supreme Court on Tuesday asked the Central government to furnish details of Haj pilgrimage aspirants who are above 60 years and have applied for it five times without success.

IANS January 30, 2018 16:52:56 IST
Supreme Court seeks details of Haj aspirants who have applied five times without success

New Delhi: The Supreme Court on Tuesday asked the Centre to furnish details of Haj pilgrimage aspirants who are above 60 years and have applied for it five times without success.

Chief Justice Dipak Misra, Justice AM Khanwilkar and Justice DY Chadrachud sought the details of such applicants in a tabular form by the next date of hearing on 19 February.

The order came on a petition by the Kerala State Haj Committee seeking rationalisation of allocation of Haj quota, contending that Kerala has more applicants but lesser allocation of Haj seats while Bihar has lesser number of applicants but more quota of seats.

Appearing for the Centre, Additional Solicitor General Pinki Anand said the petitioner has not been able to flag the violation of Article 14 of the Constitution which guarantees equality before law.

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