INS Kavaratti, last of 4 indigenously-built stealth corvettes, commissioned into Indian Navy

Apart from having a state-of-the-art weapons and sensor suite to ‘detect and prosecute’ submarines, the INS Kavaratti also has endurance for long-range deployments

FP Staff October 22, 2020 15:57:48 IST
INS Kavaratti, last of 4 indigenously-built stealth corvettes, commissioned into Indian Navy

File image of INS Kavaratti. Image Courtesy: Twitter/@airnewsalerts

Chief of Army Staff Gen MM Naravane commissioned the last of four indigenously built anti-submarine warfare (ASW) stealth corvettes 'INS Kavaratti' into the Indian Navy in Visakhapatnam on Thursday.

Indian Navy in a statement said: "The ship portrays our growing capability in becoming self-reliant through indigenisation. With the induction of Kavaratti into its fold, the Indian Navy’s preparedness will be enhanced."

After completing sea trials of all the systems fitted onboard, the combat-ready INS Kavaratti was formally commissioned into the Indian Navy by Indian Army Chief, General MM Naravane at Naval Dockyard, Visakhapatnam.

The ship was designed by the Indian Navy's in-house organisation, Directorate of Naval Design (DND), and built by Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers (GRSE), Kolkata.

Navy officials said the INS Kavaratti has a state-of-the-art weapons and sensor suite capable of "detecting and prosecuting" submarines.

In addition to its anti-submarine warfare capability, the ship also has a credible self-defence capability and good endurance for long-range deployments.

Under Project 28, INS Kavaratti is the last of four indigenously built Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) stealth corvettes.

"The ship has up to 90 percent indigenous content and the use of carbon composites for the superstructure is a commendable feat achieved in Indian shipbuilding," the Indian Navy said in a statement.

The Navy said the ship's weapons and sensors suite is predominantly indigenous and showcases the nation's growing capability in this niche area.

The ship will be commissioned into the Navy as a combat-ready platform as the ship has completed sea trials of all the systems fitted onboard.

Ships of this class have a displacement of 33,000 tonnes (as a comparison a Kalveri class submarine is 1,565 tonnes), with a span of 109m lengthwise and beam of 13.7m. Along with INS Kamorta, INS Kadmatt and INS Kiltan will form a major part of the Eastern Fleet of the Indian Navy.

The ships built under Project 28 is the best example of "Make in India" initiative, and in the last Ex Malabar, INS Kiltan had participated. These ships have the capability to fight in Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Warfare conditions too.

Kavaratti takes her name from erstwhile INS Kavaratti which was an Arnala class missile corvette. The older Kavaratti distinguished herself by operating in support of was Bangladesh's liberation in 1971.

With inputs from agencies

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