IIT professor developed a software that detects Coronavirus in five seconds by using the patient's X-ray scan

He has filed a patent for the software and has approached the Indian Council of Medical Research for a review.

Press Trust of India April 24, 2020 15:58:45 IST
IIT professor developed a software that detects Coronavirus in five seconds by using the patient's X-ray scan

An IIT-Roorkee professor claims to have developed a software which can detect COVID-19 within five seconds using an X-ray scan of the suspected patient.

The professor, who took over 40 days to develop the software, has filed a patent for the same and has approached the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) for a review.

Kamal Jain, a professor at the institute's civil engineering department, claims that the software will not only reduce testing costs but will also reduce the risk of exposure to healthcare professionals.

So far, there is no verification of his claim by a medical institution.

IIT professor developed a software that detects Coronavirus in five seconds by using the patients Xray scan

The pneumonia caused by COVID-19 is very severe and it affects the lungs completely. Image credit: Wikipedia

"I first developed an artificial intelligence-based database after analysing over 60,000 X-ray scans, including those of COVID-19, pneumonia and tuberculosis patients to differentiate between the kind of chest congestion suffered in the three diseases. I also analysed the chest x-ray database of the United States' NIH Clinical Center," Jain told PTI.

"Using the software developed by me, the doctors can simply upload pictures of an individual's X-ray. The software will not only classify whether the patient has any sign of pneumonia, it will be able to tell whether it is due to COVID-19 or other bacteria and also measure the severity of the infection. The results can be processed within five seconds" he added.

Jain said the software can help in accurate preliminary screening which can be supplemented by clinical testing for those tested positive for the deadly virus.

"The pneumonia caused by COVID-19 is severe than other bacteria as it affects the lungs completely than smaller portions of lungs in other cases. The software will analyse bilateral opacity, pattern of fluid build-up in lungs and nature of clump or clot if any," the professor said.

"Similar kinds of experiments are being conducted by the University of Amazon in the United States but there has not been a breakthrough yet," he claimed.

According to the Union Health Ministry, the death toll due to COVID-19 rose to 718 and the number of cases to 23,077 in the country on Friday.

The number of active COVID-19 cases is 17,610 as 4,748 people have been cured and discharged, and one patient migrated, it said.

The ICMR said a total 23,502 samples have been confirmed positive for coronavirus so far.

Updated Date:

also read

Foxconn sees AI driving strong server demand, but full year to be flat
World

Foxconn sees AI driving strong server demand, but full year to be flat

At Foxconn annual shareholders meeting, Chairman Liu Young-way said the firm remained cautious about this year due to monetary policy tightening, geopolitical tensions and uncertainty over inflation, but servers were a bright spot due to surging interest in AI

The Power of AI: Why Nvidia became the first chipmaking company to enter $1 trillion club
Explainers

The Power of AI: Why Nvidia became the first chipmaking company to enter $1 trillion club

Nvidia, a company known for making graphics processing units favoured by hardcore gamers, is benefitting from the hype surrounding Artificial Intelligence on Wall Street. Its GPUs have become a go-to for researchers looking to train and run such programmes

Fake photo of explosion at Pentagon goes viral: How to detect AI images
Explainers

Fake photo of explosion at Pentagon goes viral: How to detect AI images

The image widely shared on Monday of a blast near the Pentagon turned out to be fake. Earlier, AI-generated photos of Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin’s arrests had gone viral. With such pictures becoming more common day by day, here’s how you can spot fakes