U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan invites PM Narendra Modi to address Congress | Reuters

WASHINGTON U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan invited Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Thursday to address a joint meeting of Congress when he visits Washington in June, an unusual show of warmth for a foreign leader. 'This address presents a special opportunity to hear from the elected leader of the world’s most populous democracy on how our two nations can work together to promote our shared values and to increase prosperity,' the Republican leader of the House of Representatives said in a statement

Reuters April 28, 2016 22:05:50 IST
U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan invites PM Narendra Modi to address Congress
| Reuters

US House Speaker Paul Ryan invites PM Narendra Modi to address Congress
 Reuters

WASHINGTON U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan invited Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Thursday to address a joint meeting of Congress when he visits Washington in June, an unusual show of warmth for a foreign leader.

"This address presents a special opportunity to hear from the elected leader of the world’s most populous democracy on how our two nations can work together to promote our shared values and to increase prosperity," the Republican leader of the House of Representatives said in a statement.

The invitation is a sharp turnaround for Modi, who was once barred from the United States over massacres of Muslims.

Opportunities to address the House and Senate are considered a great honor. There have only been two in the past year: Pope Francis, on Sept. 24, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, on April 29, 2015.

When Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party and its allies swept India's elections in 2014, there were initially questions about whether he would qualify for a visa. President Barack Obama quickly dismissed the issue by inviting him to the White House when he called to congratulate him on his victory.

In 2002, when Modi had just become Gujarat's chief minister, more than 1,000 people, mostly Muslims, were killed in sectarian riots in the state.

The administration of President George W. Bush denied Modi a visa in 2005 under a 1998 U.S. law barring entry to foreigners who have committed "particularly severe violations of religious freedom."

Modi denied any wrongdoing. India's Supreme Court ruled in 2010 he had no case to answer.

Washington sees its relationship with India as critical, partly to counterbalance China's rising power. Obama has called it "one of the defining partnerships of the 21st century."

(Reporting by Patricia Zengerle and Richard Cowan; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Frances Kerry)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

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