Scientists record 'screams' of dying star

Scientists have recorded the 'screams' of a dying star, which let out periodic bursts of light as it was devoured by a black hole.

hidden August 09, 2012 11:40:42 IST
Scientists record 'screams' of dying star

The "screams" of a dying star have been recorded by scientists for the very first time, the Daily Mail reported Wednesday.

The star let out periodic bursts of light as it was devoured by a black hole, scientists discovered.

Scientists record screams of dying star

Reuters

Researchers at the University of Michigan picked up semi-regular blips - which they have likened to dying screams - in the light of the star 3.9 billion light years away in the direction of the constellation Draco on orbiting X-ray telescopes.

The blips, scientifically known as "quasi-periodic oscillations", occurred steadily every 200 seconds until disappearing completely.

They are believed to emanate from material about to be sucked in to a black hole, according to the newspaper.

IANS

Updated Date:

Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets. Get technology news, gadgets reviews & ratings. Popular gadgets including laptop, tablet and mobile specifications, features, prices, comparison.

also read

As Star Wars fan movies mushroom globally, a new era of alternate storytelling comes to fore on YouTube
Entertainment

As Star Wars fan movies mushroom globally, a new era of alternate storytelling comes to fore on YouTube

Far from the amateur, camcorder-in-the-woods aesthetics of some past efforts, recent productions range from intricately plotted live action to digital shorts made with motion-capture suits.

NASA gears up for final 'green test' of its SLS megarocket the Artemis moon missions
science

NASA gears up for final 'green test' of its SLS megarocket the Artemis moon missions

The upcoming Green Run hot fire test will be a key milestone event for NASA’s Artemis missions.

Star sisters: Around 500 stars born together in Theia 456 are now moving together
science

Star sisters: Around 500 stars born together in Theia 456 are now moving together

All the stars streams in the Milky Way have been conveniently named Theia for the Greek Titan goddess of sight and heavenly light.