India vs Bangladesh: Russell Domingo says conditions in Delhi not ideal because of pollution but no one will die

The prevailing smoggy conditions in the national capital are not perfect admitted Bangladesh coach Russell Domingo but said "no one is dying" as pollution is an issue in their country as well.

Press Trust of India, Nov 01, 2019 20:55:40 IST

New Delhi: The prevailing smoggy conditions in the national capital are not perfect admitted Bangladesh coach Russell Domingo but said "no one is dying" as pollution is an issue in their country as well.

India vs Bangladesh: Russell Domingo says conditions in Delhi not ideal because of pollution but no one will die

Bangladesh cricket team head coach Russell Domingo (R) and bowling coach Daniel Vettori wearing face masks as they watch their team during a practice session. AFP

Domingo said getting exposed to poor air quality air in India was not as big a shock for them as it is for some other countries.

Bangladesh players Al Amin, Abu Hider Rony and team's spin consultant Daniel Vettori were seen wearing masks during their fielding session this morning.

"We know the Sri Lankans struggled last time and look there's a bit of pollution in Bangladesh as well, so it's a not a massive shock unlike some other countries. The players have just got on with the game and haven't complained too much about it," Domingo told reporters.

As the situation got better, the players removed their masks, except Vettori and other non-Bangladeshi support staff.

"It's only three hours so it's going to be easy. There maybe scratchy eyes, sore throat but that's ok. No one is dying," Domingo added.

The pollution levels in the Delhi-NCR region entered the "severe plus" category" on Friday, propelling the Environment Pollution (Prevention and Control) Authority to declare a public health emergency.

The Supreme Court mandated panel also banned the bursting of crackers during the winter season apart from banning the construction activity till 5 November.

On Thursday, Bangladesh batsman Liton Das briefly wore the mask during practice session but later said it was due to a personal health issue and not because of pollution.

Domingo admitted that the situation is not ideal and it's same for both teams.

"There's no breeze but obviously not perfect weather with the smog. But it same for both teams. Not perfect, not ideal but you can't complaint about and get on with the game," the coach said.

When India's batting coach Vikram Rathour's response was sought on prevailing conditions, he said,"You are asking the wrong person. I have played all my cricket in North India (Punjab and Himachal Pradesh). Basically nothing special. There is pollution but a game has been scheduled and we have to play."

BCCI president Sourav Ganguly made it clear on Thursday that match will not be cancelled at the last minute but promised practical scheduling in future, hinting that North India venues may not considered for matches post Diwali.

'Negotiating pink ball during twilight most challenging in day-night Test'

Batting during twilight and spotting a not-so pronounced seam of pink ball when wrist spinners put in the revolutions are some of the technical concerns for Bangladesh coach Russell Domingo ahead of his team's first-ever day-night Test against India at the Eden Gardens from November 22.

Domingo was the South Africa coach when they played Australia in a Day-Night Test in 2016 and is aware of some practical difficulties that his current team might face.

"It's a difficult ball to see when you are batting particularly in the phase between sunset and dark (twilight). Guys struggle against wrist spinners because it is difficult to see the seam as it is not pronounced like red ball with white seam (stiches)," Domingo said when asked about the challenges.

Cheteshwar Pujara too said pink ball could pose some problems during the twilight period.

"In the twilight period, I feel that maybe, sighting the ball could be a little challenging. (But) the more you play, you get used to it. It's always about experience and knowing how the ball is behaving," India's ever-dependable No 3 told PTI in an interview earlier in the day.

Another issued with the pink ball is that it gets scuffed up easily, said Domingo.

"The ball used to flake a lot easier. It gets softer and breaks up a little more. It does shape and swing for 10-12 overs and then it starts to lose that," Domingo said.

The Bangladesh coach is concerned that his team didn't even get to play a practice game with the pink ball.

"There is a concern with three days between two Test matches here. We have just got two practice days. So there's not a lot of time to prepare with it. I suppose it's the same for India. But it is a challenge that we are facing."

A practice match would have been ideal preparation, said the former Proteas coach.

"It would have been great to have played a two-day game with the pink ball. When I was with South Africa, we played a two-day game before playing the day-night Test in Adelaide.

Updated Date: Nov 01, 2019 20:55:40 IST






Rank Team Points Rating
1 India 4659 119
2 New Zealand 2829 109
3 England 4366 104
4 South Africa 3177 102
5 Australia 3270 99
6 Sri Lanka 3795 95
Rank Team Points Rating
1 England 6745 125
2 India 7071 122
3 New Zealand 4837 112
4 Australia 5543 111
5 South Africa 5193 110
6 Pakistan 5019 98
Rank Team Points Rating
1 Pakistan 8366 270
2 Australia 6986 269
3 England 5264 263
4 South Africa 4720 262
5 India 9072 259
6 New Zealand 5843 254