Sabyasachi apologises for 'saree' remark: 'Some consumers are being conditioned to believe that it ages women'

After receiving a lot of pushback for his comments on the inability of some Indian women to drape a saree, ace designer Sabyasachi Mukherjee has issued an apology

FP Staff February 14, 2018 15:51:22 IST
Sabyasachi apologises for 'saree' remark: 'Some consumers are being conditioned to believe that it ages women'

After receiving a lot of pushback for his comments on the inability of some Indian women to drape a saree, ace designer Sabyasachi Mukherjee has issued an apology. On being asked about the difficulties of draping a saree at the Harvard India Conference, he said the "I think, if you tell me that you do not know how to wear a saree, I would say shame on you. It’s a part of your culture, (you) need to stand up for it.”

Sabyasachi apologises for saree remark Some consumers are being conditioned to believe that it ages women

Sabyasachi Mukherjee. Image from Twitter/@htlifeandstyle

His comments sparked off a huge debate about whether shame should be associated with not knowing how to wear a garment, given how little freedom women have in our society. Men and women expressed their outrage with his statement, terming it misogynist and feudal. The designer has addressed all these concerns in an elaborate apology which he posted on his Instagram page.

He says, as someone who has worked with the saree for years, the stigma around the garment stresses him out. Having to deal with all the negativity that surrounds the garment had resulted in a lot of pent up frustration in the designer, which he claims came out in the wrong way during the talk. He apologises for the usage of the word 'shame' and says that his intent was to call out women who judge other women for wearing sarees, immediately deeming them regressive.

The designer, who recently dresses Anushka Sharma for her wedding functions, says "Body shaming, attaching connotations of ‘Auntie Ji’, calling them sloppy; these are all ways that some men and women alike belittle the sari (and, more accurately, the wearer of the sari). These comments are laced with sarcasm and connotations of cultural repression and backwardness."

Now I have worked with the sari for 16 years. During this time, I have had countless open dialogues in various forums pan-India with women of all age groups and income brackets about the constant barrage of negativity surrounding it. Yet another question of ageism and the sari at Harvard triggered a lot of pent-up frustration that I have accrued for that segment of our society which constantly expresses disdain for this piece of Indian heritage. It is this frustration that I unfortunately generalised to Indian women in response to the question, when I now see that I should have framed it as a call to stop shaming the sari and whomever chooses to wear it. I am passionate about textiles and our heritage, and I am sorry that in the heat of that moment, I allowed this passion to be misplaced. I take full responsibility for this. On the topic of the sari, I ask you today: how many times have you or someone you know encountered this issue? Body shaming, attaching connotations of ‘Auntie Ji’, calling them sloppy; these are all ways that some men and women alike belittle the sari (and, more accurately, the wearer of the sari). These comments are laced with sarcasm and connotations of cultural repression and backwardness. Many women, young and old, are scared to have an outing in a sari because it is shrouded in so many layers of taboo and controversy, often citing inability to correctly drape a sari as an exit point. We are a celebrity-obsessed country, and yes, it does affect consumption patterns and social behaviour at-large. Some consumers are being conditioned to believe that the sari ages women, and you will see the evidence of that clearly documented by so many social media trolls targeting celebrities online. Isn’t that shaming, or shall we call it cyber-bullying? Yet we are often complicit in this, which may even be welcomed by some to encourage more traffic to a website/blog. #Sabyasachi #TheWorldOfSabyasachi

A post shared by Sabyasachi Mukherjee (@sabyasachiofficial) on

Let’s also talk about another subject that has arisen out of the fervent discussions occurring about me and my brand, and one that has always been a big topic on gender inequality and the patriarchy (which, according to some of you, I am ardently supporting): the pay gap. It is humiliating to have to defend yourself in public but sometimes a bitter medicine needs to be swallowed to drive home a hidden truth. I would like to bring to your notice, that the majority of my staff at Sabyasachi Couture are women. From pattern makers, to seamstresses, to designers, to publicists, to IT consultants, department heads, store managers, and core of management; women comprise the top earners on my payroll – and it is not because they are women, but because they’ve earned it by their merit. And every Friday, men and women alike at Sabyasachi wear Indian clothing to celebrate our love for textiles, with zero enforcement. Mine is a women-oriented brand and I owe my complete success to them. I have always, and will continue to love and respect women irrespective of the labels recently assigned to me. It was in this spirit that I started my brand, and that is how it shall remain till the day we decide to shut its doors. I once again apologise for the distress caused by the words I used, but not for the intent, which often takes a back seat when slammed by controversy. My intent was to call out those women who proudly proclaim that they don’t wear saris and simultaneously shame others who wear saris by saying it makes them look older, backward, or culturally repressed. My social media team takes extreme care that not a single negative comment written by you is censored, so that the world can make their own judgments and have a transparent view of the brand. Tomorrow, you can shame me further on twitter, make provocative headlines out of this letter, or choose to blacklist us as consumers. It is absolutely fair and understandable because it is your prerogative. For us, for better or for worse, it will be business as usual. #Sabyasachi #TheWorldOfSabyasachi A post shared by Sabyasachi Mukherjee (@sabyasachiofficial) on

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