Nick Jonas' electronic-rich album Spaceman captures the unease, alienation of the past year

Jonas has never been more relatable.

The Associated Press March 15, 2021 12:09:45 IST
Nick Jonas' electronic-rich album Spaceman captures the unease, alienation of the past year

Cover image for Spaceman.

Make room, Paul McCartney, Snow Patrol and Taylor Swift. Add Nick Jonas to the growing list of artists who have made fabulous albums during the pandemic.

Jonas’ 11-track electronic-rich Spaceman is an airy and slightly unmoored love letter from a lusty man who is drinking alone, a little crazed and maybe paranoid. “Too drunk and I’m all in my feelings,” he sings in the excellent '2Drunk'. “Should I send that text? Maybe not/But I miss the sex.”

In other words, we are all Nick Jonas.

The pandemic seems to have scrambled the newlywed, who should have been enjoying his honeymoon period with actor Priyanka Chopra. The unrushed Troye Sivan-like 'Don’t Give Up On Us', the opening track, is alarming coming so soon in a love affair.

Not to worry: Delicious is so steamy it should come with a explicit warning. (“I’m licking the dishes,” he purrs). 'This Is Heaven' is a more PG love song, sounding like something Lionel Richie would record, complete with an old school horn solo.

Things get naughty again on the aptly named 'Sexual' — “Tongue tied/Follow your neck down to your thighs.” His lover “puts the sex in sexual.” In a nice nod to his Indian-born love, he’s included an electric sitar. His falsetto soars and the bed is "soaked".

'Deeper Love' — which samples from 'I Want to Know What Love Is' by Foreigner — might actually remind listeners of an updated version of Steve Winwood “Higher Love.” More traditional Jonas-sounding songs are also on the album, like 'If I Fall' and 'Nervous'.

Jonas co-wrote every track with producer and multi-instrumentalist Greg Kurstin and the songwriter and singer Mozella. He was separated from Chopra last summer when she filmed in Germany and explored that loss and discomfort.

Jonas has never been more relatable. He, too, likely was watching The Last Dance along with all of us, slipping in a reference on the album to “MJ in the playoffs.” His TV is always on. “All my friends are home/So am I,” he sings.

It all comes together on the title track, which is chilly and brilliant as it captures us all in lockdown, like terrestrial astronauts. “Mask off minute I get home/All safe now that I’m alone.” Few songs in the past year have better captured the unease and alienation of this past year.

Updated Date:

also read

Birju Maharaj on living, breathing and dreaming Kathak: 'Art will never betray you'
Entertainment

Birju Maharaj on living, breathing and dreaming Kathak: 'Art will never betray you'

"Don't do Kathak in haste. Don't go for an item [dance number]. It hurts the complete emotion of doing. Items will happen, applause will come in too; instead, go steady, let the art mature": Pandit Birju Maharaj's parting words from a 2017 exclusive interview.

From The Batman, The Lord of the Rings to our very own Brahmastra, 2022 will be a year of varying nerdgasms
Entertainment

From The Batman, The Lord of the Rings to our very own Brahmastra, 2022 will be a year of varying nerdgasms

There is a purity and reassurance to the fact that even at a time when box office returns may be uncertain and moviegoing may be on the decline, the number of exciting stories and rich new worlds to explore and get lost in certainly isn’t.

Tracing the rise of India’s hip-hop scene: Baba Sehgal, Bohemia to Raftaar, Divine, Raja Kumari, Karma, Shah Rule, D'Evil
Entertainment

Tracing the rise of India’s hip-hop scene: Baba Sehgal, Bohemia to Raftaar, Divine, Raja Kumari, Karma, Shah Rule, D'Evil

From the big labels to streaming giants and brands, they are all saying the same thing: hip-hop is the hottest independent music genre in India in 2022, and it is only going to get bigger.