Kis Kisko Pyaar Karoon review: The biggest joke is that Kapil Sharma's debut film was to be a comedy

Thriller specialists Abbas-Mustan do a David Dhawan and Kapil Sharma does a feature film version of his comedy show in Kis Kisko Pyaar Karu

Gayatri Gauri September 26, 2015 09:39:08 IST
Kis Kisko Pyaar Karoon review: The biggest joke is that Kapil Sharma's debut film was to be a comedy

Thriller specialists Abbas-Mustan do a David Dhawan and Kapil Sharma does a feature film version of his comedy show. Without a single funny line. The result: a one-man show that might have worked with yesteryear’s Govinda and the Sajan Chale Sasural genre. With Sharma in every frame, giving the same pop-eyed look and rattling off dialogues like he’s reading fine print in a mutual fund advertisement, Kis Kisko Pyaar Karu is about one man and his three wives. That’s four comedy shows in one. Only, the actual comedy shows on TV are better.

Depending on your sense of humour, this film could be a comedy or a tragedy. For Sharma fans, the answer is clear. For others, the only funny moments in the film come with Sharat Saxena as Sharma’s on screen father , explaining his own infidelity with a lyric from an old song:

Ek hawa ka jhoka aaya,
Toota dali se phool
Na pawan ki na chaman ki,
Kis ki hai yeh bhool?

Kis Kisko Pyaar Karoon review The biggest joke is that Kapil Sharmas debut film was to be a comedy

Kapil Sharma in a still from Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karu.

Sharma plays Kumar, whose own predicament is explained as a series of accidents. Biwi Number One, Juhi (Manjari Phadnis), is dumped on Kumar by a dying father.

Biwi Number Two, Anjali (Sai Lokur), is forced upon Kumar by a deaf don brother, Tiger bhai (Arbaaz Khan, accompanied by a roar in the background score). Biwi Number Three, Simran (Simran Kaur Mundi) traps Kumar when her own groom runs away.

Since Kumar wants to be a good husband to each of his three wives – this means a good morning kiss to each of them and bushels of lies throughout the day – his lawyer buddy Karan (Varun Sharma) advises Kumar to buy three flats in one building. Less commute, more time to philander.

And so it is that Kumar moves in to Cocktail Towers with his three wives, each of whom thinks she’s the light of his life. The husband resolves his morning goodbye by standing at the building gate and waving at all three wives standing at their balconies, one above the other.

As might be evident, this film is not about logic. It’s about how smart Kumar is when it comes to managing his lies and keeping the truth from his three wives. So we gloss over details like the fact that we have no idea what exactly Kumar does for a living, other than wear reflectors and carry briefcases. And we’re expected to laugh at the strategies Karan resorts to in order to save his buddy’s rear end. So the falling of an underwear from one wife’s washing line to another wife’s balcony is explained using Newton and gravity in a joke that makes sense only to the makers and the maid who drops the underwear.

Kumar deals with his marital stress by dancing away with a girlfriend, Deepika (Elli Avram). So when Kumar is not hiding from one wife or the other, he is busy hiding all three from Deepika and her dad. The film rushes through escapades in a mall when everyone from the wives to Deepika’s father and Tiger bhai land up and play hide and seek. Lame April Fool jokes come into play and juvenile antics grow with the full moon on a Karva Chauth night.

The one good thing about KKPK is the pace at which Abbas-Mustan keep the film moving. Given more believable situations and lines, they might have done better. Meanwhile, if the sight of Kumar hanging on a wall and bringing in the moon, makes you laugh, go watch KKPK, but at your own risk.

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