Cannes Film Festival 2018: On Day 2, Martin Scorsese recalls Mean Streets; Quixote to screen after legal row

FP Staff

May,10 2018 19:36:26 IST

After Tuesday night's opening ceremony for the Cannes Film Festival 2018, more movie industry professionals and cinema stars headed from all over the world to the French Riviera on Wednesday.

Here's a roundup of all that transpired on Day 2 of the most celebrated film festival of the year:

Martin Scorsese returns to Cannes, recalls Mean Streets

Director Martin Scorsese poses for photographers upon arrival at the opening ceremony of the 71st international film festival, Cannes, southern France, Tuesday, May 8, 2018. (Photo by Joel C Ryan/Invision/AP)

Director Martin Scorsese poses for photographers upon arrival at the opening ceremony of the 71st international film festival, Cannes. AP Photo

Forty-four years after his Cannes Film Festival debut, Mean Streets, Martin Scorsese returned to the Croisette to recall his breakthrough film, one he said he only understood years later. A day after declaring open the 71st Cannes festival with jury president Cate Blanchett, Scorsese joined a post-screening conversation for Mean Streets, which played in the Cannes' Directors Fortnight section in 1974. "This was the first time for me at Cannes," said Scorsese. "And it was almost the best because of anonymity and trying very hard to change that (sic)."

Mean Streets, of course, helped establish Scorsese, who then had two features under his belt (Who's That Knocking on My Door and Boxcar Bertha). Two years after Mean Streets landed in Cannes, Scorsese's Taxi Driver would win the Palme d'Or despite booing at its premiere and the reported apprehensions of jury president Tennessee Williams. And Mean Streets, about two Catholic brothers — Harvey Keitel's responsible, guilt-ridden Charlie and Robert De Niro's more combustible Johnny Boy — in a violent, gangster-controlled Little Italy, remains one of Scorsese's most personal films.

Party on! Bill and Ted are back for another excellent adventure

Nearly 30 years after cinema-goers last saw time-travelling headbangers Bill and Ted, the original cast including Keanu Reeves has signed on for another excellent adventure. The international rights to Bill and Ted Face the Music, the third instalment in the franchise, is being sold at the Cannes film festival by MGM, Variety reported.

Reeves and actor Alex Winter will reprise their roles as slacker adventurers Ted "Theodore" Logan and Bill S Preston Esq., as now middle-aged dads bogged down by responsibility and in a musical slump. But when a visitor from the future tells them that the fate of humanity is in their hands, they set out to save the universe with the greatest song ever written.

The film, the first sequel since Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey in 1991, has reportedly been in the works since 2007 and is now in pre-production, with Oscar-winning director Steven Soderbergh on board as an executive producer. The series began in 1989 with the global hit Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure.

Court rules Terry Gilliam's Quixote can screen in Cannes

A Paris court ruled that Terry Gilliam can show The Man Who Killed Don Quixote at the Cannes Film Festival, removing the final hurdle in his 20-year battle to get the story to the screen. Fans welcomed the news as a sign that “the curse of Don Quixote” was finally broken, after Gilliam had to abandon an initial version starring Johnny Depp in 2000 due to a series of calamities, including flooding, ill health and money problems.

Finally remade with Jonathan Pryce and Adam Driver, Cannes selected the film to close the festival on May 19, but a last-minute legal challenge from a former producer who says he owns the rights meant that remained uncertain until Wednesday’s ruling. Adding to the idea of a curse, The Guardian newspaper reported earlier on Wednesday that Gilliam, 77, had suffered a minor stroke at the weekend, but he tweeted he was now fine: “After days of rest and prayers to the gods I am restored and well again.”

Festival organisers also expressed their delight at being able to show the film in which Pryce plays a modern-day man who believes he is Don Quixote, the fictional Spanish knight from Cervantes’ classic 17th century novel. “Let’s make this victory a great party,” the festival tweeted, referring to the closing screening on 19 May.

Detained Russian director gets standing ovation

Producers Ilya Stewart, from left, Charles-Evrard Tchekhoff, director of photography Vladislav Opelyants, actors Roma Zver, Irina Starshenbaum and Teo Yoo pose for photographers upon arrival at the premiere of the film 'Leto' at the 71st international film festival, Cannes, southern France, Wednesday, May 9, 2018. (Photo by Joel C Ryan/Invision/AP)

(From L-R) Producers Ilya Stewart, Charles-Evrard Tchekhoff, director of photography Vladislav Opelyants, actors Roma Zver, Irina Starshenbaum and Teo Yoo pose for photographers upon arrival at the premiere of the film 'Leto' at Cannes. Photo by Joel C Ryan/Invision/AP

A new film by the enfant terrible of Russian theatre — who is under house arrest in Moscow — got a standing ovation before it was even shown at the Cannes film festival. The cast of Kirill Serebrennikov's Leto, a biopic of the Soviet-Korean rock legend Viktor Tsoi, were cheered as the movie premiered at the world's top film festival.

They had earlier held up a white placard with the director's name on it after climbing the steps of the red carpet to the cinema. A seat was left symbolically empty inside for Serebrennikov, who has been under house arrest on embezzlement charges since last August. He has dismissed the charges as "absurd" and his supporters see them as political.

Serebrennikov's detention has sent shockwaves through the Russian arts world. The 48-year-old has revolutionised Moscow's theatre scene with radical stagings of new plays and by reinventing classics. He has also won prizes at the Cannes and Rome film festivals, while his 2012 film Betrayal was nominated for the prestigious Golden Lion at Venice. Leto, which means summer, is in the running for Cannes' top prize, the Palme d'Or. It tells the story of Tsoi, whose songs are seen in Russia as anthems of the late 1980s Perestroika era.

Both the festival and the French government pleaded with Moscow to allow Serebrennikov to travel to Cannes for the screening.

With inputs from agencies

Updated Date: May 10, 2018 19:36 PM