A seven-yr-old reviews Chhota Bheem And The Throne Of Bali

Here is what seven-year-old Miraya Mitra Saigal thinks of Chhota Bheem And The Throne of Bali. Read more.

Miraya Mitra Saigal May 13, 2013 15:54:42 IST
A seven-yr-old reviews Chhota Bheem And The Throne Of Bali

My mother hates me watching TV. Ever since Cbeebies disappeared, she says all television programmes are ‘junk’. I watch Chhota Bheem on TV, sometimes.

Chhota Bheem is the story of a nine-year-old boy and the adventures he has with his friends. The names of Bheem’s friends are Chutki – she’s my favourite, Raju – a four-year-old boy, Kalia – the bully and Dholu and Bholu – they are Kalia’s sidekicks. Jaggu, a super-smart monkey, is also a part of the group.

A sevenyrold reviews Chhota Bheem And The Throne Of Bali

Courtesy: ibn live

I was very excited when I heard there was a new Chhota Bheem film in the theatre. I felt happy because I could eat caramel popcorn and if I behaved really well, I would even get an orange Bolt drink.

Last year too there was a film called Chhota Bheem and The Curse of the Damyaan. I dragged my mother to see it and I noticed she was rolling her eyes through the movie. To be truthful even I did not like it because there were snakes and the story was a little bit silly and also boring. I liked the song Jam, Jam Jamboora in the film. We left the movie half-way through.

Chota Bheem and the Throne of Bali was better than the Damyaan movie. There were foolish things like the weird-looking zombies. I noticed my mother rolling her eyes again, but I did not look at her in case she suggested we leave.

In this film, Bheem, who is a brave child warrior, eats his favourite ladoos and then beats up all the bad zombies and monsters.

There was a red-coloured witch in the film called Rangada. She looked a little scary but also quite funny. Just to bug my mother I said she looked cute. Rangada wanted to rule Bali and capture the place with her zombie army. Bheem was gifted a magical knife and he rescued everyone.

I thought the songs were fun but Dholu and Bholu looked quite dumb chasing all the girls in Bali. Even the monsters looked more yucky than scary.

There were not too many kids in the hall. Last week I had gone to see The Croods, that was much more fun and there were lots of children my age who had come to see the film. My mother sighed and said one cannot compare the quality of animation in both films.

When I asked her what animation was, she said it was the moving cartoons and images.

A sevenyrold reviews Chhota Bheem And The Throne Of Bali Miraya Mitra Saigal is seven-year-old. She studies at Bombay Scottish School in Mahim. Miraya loves to read books, watch television and play with the ipad when given an opportunity. Right now she has a two-month long summer vacation and is finding ways to keep herself busy and drive all adults around her nuts.

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