Ugandan unit of Indian drugs firm Cipla raises $43.8 million in IPO: Renaissance Capital

(Corrects amount raised in IPO to 167 billion shillings from 155 billion) KAMPALA (Reuters) - The Ugandan unit of India's pharmaceutical giant Cipla raised 167 billion Ugandan shillings ($43.8 million) from its oversubscribed initial public offering (IPO), an investment bank that helped advise on the transaction said on Monday. Cipla Quality Chemical Industries Ltd (CQCIL), majority owned by India's third-largest drugmaker, sold 657 million shares equivalent to 18 percent of the firm's total equity.

Reuters September 18, 2018 01:05:39 IST
Ugandan unit of Indian drugs firm Cipla raises $43.8 million in IPO: Renaissance Capital

Ugandan unit of Indian drugs firm Cipla raises 438 million in IPO Renaissance Capital

(Corrects amount raised in IPO to 167 billion shillings from 155 billion)

KAMPALA (Reuters) - The Ugandan unit of India's pharmaceutical giant Cipla raised 167 billion Ugandan shillings ($43.8 million) from its oversubscribed initial public offering (IPO), an investment bank that helped advise on the transaction said on Monday.

Cipla Quality Chemical Industries Ltd (CQCIL), majority owned by India's third-largest drugmaker, sold 657 million shares equivalent to 18 percent of the firm's total equity. Each share in the IPO was priced at 256.5 shillings and closed the first day of trading up 2.1 percent at 262 Ugandan shillings.

John Porter, chief business officer at investment bank Renaissance Capital, told Reuters interest came from local and international investors.

"The offering has been oversubscribed with the major part of the demand coming from blue-chip sub-Saharan Africa investors," Porter said, speaking during a function to launch the firm's debut on the Uganda Securities Exchange (USE).

He did not say by how much the IPO was oversubscribed.

Cipla Quality Chemical Industries Ltd, established in 2005, has a factory in Uganda's capital Kampala and makes a range of drugs including antiretrovirals, anti-malaria and drugs to treat Hepatitis B and C. Most of the drugs are sold in Sub-Saharan Africa.

The IPO is the first on the Ugandan bourse, a small exchange of about 17 equities, since 2012 when the country's sole power distributor Umeme Ltd went public.

($1 = 3,809.1900 Ugandan shillings)

(Reporting by Elias Biryabarema; Editing by George Obulutsa and Edmund Blair/Emelia Sithole-Matarise)

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