Nike stumbles into social media storm after basketball star's shoe splits

By Melissa Fares and Amy Tennery NEW YORK (Reuters) - A Nike Inc sneaker worn by a college basketball superstar split in half less than a minute into a highly anticipated game between Duke University and North Carolina, prompting an outcry on social media as the company sought to figure out what caused the malfunction.

Reuters February 22, 2019 01:06:35 IST
Nike stumbles into social media storm after basketball star's shoe splits

Nike stumbles into social media storm after basketball stars shoe splits

By Melissa Fares and Amy Tennery

NEW YORK (Reuters) - A Nike Inc sneaker worn by a college basketball superstar split in half less than a minute into a highly anticipated game between Duke University and North Carolina, prompting an outcry on social media as the company sought to figure out what caused the malfunction.

Zion Williamson, a 6-foot-7-inch freshman forward for the Duke Blue Devils who is anticipated to be the top 2019 NBA Draft pick, suffered a mild sprain to his right knee because of the incident, according to his coach Mike Krzyzewski.

A closeup video replay showed Williamson slipping and crumpling to the ground, clutching his knee in pain. His left shoe is seen split in half, with part of the sole ripped off the base of the sneaker.

Williamson did not return to play in the match-up, which ended with No. 1-ranked Duke losing 72-88 to the No. 8-ranked Tar Heels team.

"We are obviously concerned and want to wish Zion a speedy recovery," Nike said in a statement.

"The quality and performance of our products are of utmost importance. While this is an isolated occurrence, we are working to identify the issue."

Shares of the sportswear maker were down more than 1 percent in afternoon trading Thursday, a day after the incident, wiping off some $1.46 billion from Nike's market capitalization since Wednesday's close.

Oppenheimer analyst Brian Nagel said in a note he was optimistic "any lasting damage to the company and its shares will prove minimal."

Williamson was wearing the Nike PG 2.5 basketball shoe when he was injured, Nike confirmed to Reuters in an email.

The line of sneakers, launched in summer of 2018, sells for $95-$105 on Nike's website.

The shoe received mixed reviews and a rating of 4 out of 5 stars on Nike.com as of Thursday.

Nike is Duke's exclusive supplier of uniforms, shoes and apparel under a 12-year contract that was extended in 2015 and has had an exclusive deal with the private university since 1992, ESPN reported.

The company's latest results showed signs of a rebound as it speeds up new product launches and expands partnerships with online retailers. The Beaverton, Oregon-based company has forecast sales growth for 2019 approaching low double digits.

Williamson, who averaged 21.6 points a game, has been tipped as the "next Lebron James" and is expected to be selected first in the NBA Draft this June.

Krzyzewski said it was unclear how long Williamson would be out because of the injury.

Former President Barack Obama, director Spike Lee and star NFL running back Todd Gurley attended the game at Cameron Indoor Stadium, the home court of the Blue Devils.

A video from the match posted on Twitter showed Obama sitting courtside, expressing shock and mouthing the words, "his shoe broke!"

The incident lit up social media, with celebrities and some of basketball's biggest stars expressing shock and dismay.

"Hope young fella is ok!" tweeted LeBron James (@KingJames) on Wednesday. "Literally blew thru his [shoe]," he added, using a shoe emoji.

"Again let's remember all the money that went into this game.... and these players get none of it," Donovan Mitchell (@spidadmitchell), a former first-round NBA draft pick and current guard for the Utah Jazz, tweeted on Wednesday. "And now Zion gets hurt... something has to change."

This is not the first time Nike has faced controversy over the craftsmanship of its sportswear. In 2017, the company faced a backlash when several NBA jerseys worn by basketball stars, including James, ripped apart.

(Reporting by Brendan O'Brien in Milwaukee, Siddharth Cavale and Aishwarya Venugopal in Bangalore, Sudip Kar-Gupta in Paris, and Melissa Fares, Amy Tennery and April Joyner in New York; Editing by Bernard Orr and Bernadette Baum)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

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