EU regulator finds link between AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots

(Reuters) - Europe's drug regulator on Wednesday found a possible link between AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine and rare blood clots in adults who had received the inoculation. The announcement is a fresh setback for the vaccine, which is sold at cost, for a few dollars a dose, and is by far the cheapest and most high-volume launched so far. After extensive use in Britain and mainland Europe, it is set to be the mainstay of vaccination programmes in much of the developing world

Reuters April 08, 2021 00:06:30 IST
EU regulator finds link between AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots

EU regulator finds link between AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots

(Reuters) - Europe's drug regulator on Wednesday found a possible link between AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine and rare blood clots in adults who had received the inoculation.

The announcement is a fresh setback for the vaccine, which is sold at cost, for a few dollars a dose, and is by far the cheapest and most high-volume launched so far.

After extensive use in Britain and mainland Europe, it is set to be the mainstay of vaccination programmes in much of the developing world.

The following are reactions to the latest developments.

EMER COOKE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF EUROPEAN MEDICINES AGENCY (EMA)

"The risk of mortality from COVID is much greater than the risk of mortality from these rare side effects."

DR SABINE STRAUS, CHAIR OF EMA'S SAFETY COMMITTEE (PRAC)

"This is not unexpected. We know that we are rolling out vaccines on a very large scale ... we will see events occurring ... some of them by chance."

DR JACQUES BATTISTONI, HEAD OF FRENCH DOCTORS' UNION MG

"This time, the EMA confirms clearly that there is a link between vaccination and serious adverse effects. But these events are exceptional.

"Other medications also pose such risks.

"Will vaccination with AstraZeneca be harder? Most certainly. We will need to explain further and convince our patients that the benefits outweigh the risks, and that 'zero risk' just does not exist.

"We have a lot work ahead of us. However, we cannot give up on the AstraZeneca, we do not have enough doses to allow that."

PROFESSOR FREDERIC ADNET, HEAD OF EMERGENCY SERVICES OF AVICENNE HOSPITAL, BOBIGNY, FRANCE

"The EMA's communication today will undoubtedly affect confidence further in AstraZeneca's vaccine and have consequences on the vaccination deployment in France."

WEI SHEN LIM, CHAIR OF BRITAIN'S JOINT COMMITTEE ON VACCINATION AND IMMUNISATION (JCVI)

"We are not advising a stop to any vaccination for any individual in any age group. We are advising a preference for one vaccine over another vaccine for a particular age group, really out of the utmost caution, rather than because we have any serious safety concerns."

"Those who have received their first dose of AstraZeneca vaccine should continue to be offered the second dose of AstraZeneca vaccine, according to the set schedule."

PROFESSOR ANTHONY HARNDEN, DEPUTY CHAIR OF JCVI

"What is clear is that for the vast majority of people the benefits of the Oxford AZ (AstraZeneca) vaccine far outweigh any extremely small risk and the Oxford AZ vaccine will continue to save many from suffering the devastating effects that can result from a COVID infection."

DAVID WERRING, PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL NEUROLOGY, UCL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGY

"We still urgently need more research to first understand which individuals are at highest risk of these unusual blood clots in the brain, which although very rare, can often be serious or fatal."

DR MICHAEL HEAD, SENIOR RESEARCH FELLOW IN GLOBAL HEALTH, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON

"The Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine is a vital tool in the global strategy to contain the pandemic. It is being manufactured in large numbers, is stored at refrigeration temperatures and thus easier to transport, cost per dose is cheap, and key to the COVAX distribution to low- and lower-middle income countries.

"Maintaining public confidence is so important. An open, transparent process to assessing safety concerns must be part of that."

(Compiled by Reuters staff; Editing by Kevin Liffey and Matthew Lewis)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Updated Date:

TAGS:

also read

Amazon union vote enters final stretch in watershed moment for U.S. labour
Business

Amazon union vote enters final stretch in watershed moment for U.S. labour

By Mike Spector and Jeffrey Dastin (Reuters) - The National Labor Relations Board has begun reviewing ballots from Amazon.com Inc's workers in Alabama, who have voted on whether to form a union, with momentum for future labour organizing at America's second-largest private employer hanging in the balance. Agents from the labour board began sifting through ballots sent to more than 5,800 workers at Amazon's Bessemer, Alabama-based warehouse at 10 a.m

Spotify buys Locker Room app's maker Betty Labs in live audio push
News & Analysis

Spotify buys Locker Room app's maker Betty Labs in live audio push

By Elizabeth Culliford NEW YORK (Reuters) - Spotify Inc said on Tuesday it has purchased Betty Labs, the company behind sports-focused social audio app Locker Room, to accelerate its move into live audio. New voice-based platforms, including invite-only social app Clubhouse, have seen rapid growth in recent months during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Oil falls as Suez Canal opens, dollar rallies; eyes on OPEC+ meeting
Business

Oil falls as Suez Canal opens, dollar rallies; eyes on OPEC+ meeting

By Devika Krishna Kumar NEW YORK (Reuters) - Oil prices slid on Tuesday as the Suez Canal reopened to traffic and the dollar rallied, while focus turned to an OPEC+ meeting this week, where analysts expect an extension to supply curbs to offset dim demand prospects. Brent crude fell $1.20, or 1.9%, at $63.78 a barrel by 1:12 p.m.