Correction: No-deal Brexit would cost Ford up to $1 billion - source

By Ben Klayman DETROIT (Reuters) - (Corrects paragraph 3 to Ford spokesman, not unnamed source) Ford faces a bill of up to $1 billion if Britain leaves the European Union without a deal, comprising World Trade Organization tariffs and the impact of a weaker pound, a person familiar with the company's plans said on Thursday. The impact of Brexit on Ford, based on internal calculations, would be in the range of $500 million to $1 billion depending on a variety of factors, said the person, who asked not to be identified discussing internal company planning

Reuters January 25, 2019 03:05:24 IST
Correction: No-deal Brexit would cost Ford up to $1 billion - source

Correction Nodeal Brexit would cost Ford up to 1 billion  source

By Ben Klayman

DETROIT (Reuters) - (Corrects paragraph 3 to Ford spokesman, not unnamed source) Ford faces a bill of up to $1 billion if Britain leaves the European Union without a deal, comprising World Trade Organization tariffs and the impact of a weaker pound, a person familiar with the company's plans said on Thursday.

The impact of Brexit on Ford, based on internal calculations, would be in the range of $500 million to $1 billion depending on a variety of factors, said the person, who asked not to be identified discussing internal company planning.

Sky News earlier on Thursday reported the hit could be $800 million, citing a Ford spokesman.

Car makers and other manufacturers, including Airbus earlier on Thursday, have warned about the toll a no-deal Brexit could impose, including higher tariffs, disruption to supply chains and threats to jobs.

Britain is due to leave the European Union in 64 days, and with Prime Minister Theresa May failing to win support for her negotiated deal, companies are increasingly worried about the possibility of a chaotic Brexit.

Ford Chief Financial Officer Bob Shanks on Wednesday declined to say what the financial impact of a no-deal exit could be, but said Ford was already planning for it.

"We clearly have already started to work on the eventuality of there being a hard Brexit," he told reporters at the No. 2 U.S. automaker's headquarters outside Detroit. "We're certainly hoping that does not happen, but we can't wait."

"We're actually incurring costs, doing things now to prepare for that, so there will be an impact. It's a material impact," he added.

Last week, Shanks said a no-deal exit was unlikely, but if it occurred it would be "catastrophic."

In July 2016, Ford said that Britain's decision to leave the EU would impact the automaker by $800 million to $1 billion over two years.

Ford, the top-selling automotive brand in Britain, operates two engine plants in Britain, its third-largest market, and the destination for roughly one in three cars made at its German Cologne plant.

On Jan. 10, Ford, which employs 53,000 people in Europe, said it would cut thousands of jobs and look at plant closures in Europe as part of its plan to return to profit in the region.

(Reporting by Ben Klayman in Detroit, Additional reporting by Kate Holton and Paul Sandle in London; editing by Stephen Addison and James Dalgleish)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

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