Canada's Intact, Denmark's Tryg agree to buy British insurer RSA for $9.6 billion

By Iain Withers and Carolyn Cohn LONDON (Reuters) - Canada's Intact Financial and Denmark's Tryg on Wednesday said they had reached an agreement to buy British insurance group RSA for 7.2 billion pounds ($9.6 billion) in cash in one of Europe's biggest financial takeovers this year. Insurers have become an attractive proposition since the coronavirus crisis despite reputational damage from disputes over business interruption claims, industry sources say

Reuters November 19, 2020 03:05:10 IST
Canada's Intact, Denmark's Tryg agree to buy British insurer RSA for $9.6 billion

Canadas Intact Denmarks Tryg agree to buy British insurer RSA for 96 billion

By Iain Withers and Carolyn Cohn

LONDON (Reuters) - Canada's Intact Financial and Denmark's Tryg on Wednesday said they had reached an agreement to buy British insurance group RSA for 7.2 billion pounds ($9.6 billion) in cash in one of Europe's biggest financial takeovers this year.

Insurers have become an attractive proposition since the coronavirus crisis despite reputational damage from disputes over business interruption claims, industry sources say. Home-working has led to fewer claims on home and motor insurance while commercial insurance rates have risen sharply.

RSA's directors backed the Intact-Tryg bid unanimously and recommended shareholders vote in favour of the consortium's offer, the company said on Wednesday, having first flagged the approach early this month.

Best known in Britain for its More Than brand, RSA provides home, motor and commercial insurance and also has large operations in Canada, Ireland and Scandinavia.

RSA Chief Executive Stephen Hester told reporters he planned to step down after the deal's completion.

The deal "represents an excellent outcome for all of our constituencies", Hester said.

The former NatWest boss, who has shored up RSA's balance sheet with a 773 million pound rights issue and scaled back underperforming operations since joining in 2014, said he expects the deal to complete in the second quarter of 2021 but has no plans for the future as yet.

The proposed takeover would result in the break-up of the British group. Intact would gain RSA's Canada, UK and international operations while Tryg would take the Sweden and Norway businesses. The pair would co-own RSA's Danish unit.

Intact CEO Charles Brindamour told reporters his company would invest in RSA's UK operations and that job losses in the UK and Canada would be capped at 2%.

His Tryg counterpart Morten Hubbe also told reporters job losses in Scandinavia would be relatively low, describing RSA's businesses there as "high quality".

UK INVESTMENT

Tryg would pay 4.2 billion pounds while Intact would contribute 3 billion pounds, with the overall offer representing a 51% premium to RSA's Nov. 4 closing share price of 460 pence.

Canadian pension funds Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec, Canada Pension Plan Investment Board and Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan Board will contribute C$1.5 billion, C$1.2 billion and C$500 million respectively to Intact's payment, the company said in a statement https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/intact-financial-corporation-announces-agreement-with-cornerstone-investors-to-finance-a-portion-of-the-purchase-price-of-the-possible-offer-for-rsa-insurance-group-plc-rsa--865615261.html last week.

KBW analysts called the deal "transformational" for Tryg.

Activist investor Cevian Capital, RSA's largest shareholder with a 14.9% stake, said it fully supports the takeover.

Industry sources said RSA had been seeking a buyer since a 5.6 billion pound bid from Zurich Insurance collapsed in 2015. Any buyer of the UK business also needed to win over the trustees of its UK pension schemes, they said.

Intact will put extra cash into those schemes, RSA's statement said.

The appetite for insurance deals has been growing. In August motor insurer Hastings agreed to be bought by Finland's Sampo and South Africa's Rand Merchant Investment .

Intact shares rose 0.6% to C$676.80 in afternoon trading in Toronto. RSA shares closed up 4.7% in London, while Tryg ended the day down 5.1% in Copenhagen.

Morgan Stanley advised Tryg and Barclays advised Intact. Goldman Sachs , Robey Warshaw and BofA Securities advised RSA.

(Additional reporting by Nikolaj Skydsgaard in Copenhagen and Nichola Saminather in Toronto; Editing by Sinead Cruise and David Goodman)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

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