TCS To Open Subsidiary In South Africa

TCS views South Africa as a key strategic market for TCS and a gateway to southern and central Africa.

hidden October 27, 2007 10:51:08 IST
TCS To Open Subsidiary In South Africa

Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) has announced plans to open a wholly owned subsidiary in South Africa.

"We see South Africa as a key strategic market for TCS and also as a gateway to southern and central Africa. Through our own subsidiary, we will be well-placed to contribute to the economic growth of the country and its businesses by bringing in global best-practices and world-class technology solutions," S. Ramadorai, chief executive officer and managing director of TCS, said in a statement.

"The new model will help TCS make a greater contribution to the South African economy and help invest in skills and capabilities of its IT professionals by leveraging our world-class learning and development programmes," Ramadorai added.

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