American Airlines Relocates Call Centre Operations To India

hidden March 09, 2007 15:09:33 IST
American Airlines Relocates Call Centre Operations To India

American Airlines, a unit of AMR Corp., recently announced its decision to shift its Asia-Pacific call centre operations to India from Australia.

American Airlines has appointed Bird Information Systems (BIS), a technology provider of automated aviation and travel related software solutions, to provide call centre services to its customers in Indian and Asia-Pacific from its New Delhi office.

BIS will provide 24x7, 365 days a year, call centre services to tackle customer queries pertaining to travel bookings, reservation, fares, ticketing (including E-Tickets) and other general information related to the airline.

American Airlines had earlier signed City Ticket office (CTO) agreement with Bird Group. American Airlines currently operates a daily New Delhi-Chicago non-stop service.

"With increasing competition, lower margins and booming operational costs can be managed better by outsourcing non-core processes," remarked Ankur Bhatia, executive director, Bird Group.

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