articles by Chintan Girish Modi

Arts & Culture

Lahore Literary Festival's virtual edition amid COVID-19 crisis spurs cross-border exchange in absence of red tape

The transition from physical to digital has opened up a unique opportunity for the Lahore Literary Festival to reach Indians and Pakistanis living all over the world.

Arts & Culture

The Tale of the Horse: New book locates the animal's historical import in India by exploring myth, art, literature

According to writer Yashaswini Chandra, the book demanded interdisciplinary research and a layered account due to its premise concerning "the historical presence of the horse across Indian culture and society".

Entertainment

Renée Sen on her debut with short film Suttabaazi, favourite Sushmita Sen films and shooting during the pandemic

Renée Sen makes a strong impression with her performance in Suttabaazi, conveying that there is more to her than being former Miss Universe and actor Sushmita Sen’s daughter.

Lifestyle

In The Big thoughts of little Luv, Karan Johar demonstrates a pleasant shift in his portrayal of gender diversity

The fact that Luv’s story is linked to Johar’s makes it a lot more personal, and not just another book on gender stereotypes churned out because conversations around gender diversity and queerness seem 'trendy'.

Entertainment

Paurashpur wants to be progressive; instead, it has problematic takes on queer love, transness and the patriarchy

All those visuals in Paurashpur of a bare-chested Milind Soman with atmospheric lighting seem to be completely out of place, knowing that trans people’s bodies are perpetually watched, policed and violated in cis-heteronormative societies.

Arts & Culture

Novelist Bhaswati Ghosh on her Partition-era story: Important to remember past brutalities to avoid repeating violent histories

Bhaswati Ghosh’s debut novel Victory Colony 1950 is based on the lives of refugees from East Pakistan.

Entertainment

The transphobia of Pati, Patni aur Panga: MX Player show's ignorant writing uses trans experiences solely to elicit humour

The premise of this show, produced by Jay Sahni and Anushree Mehta, is novel, interesting, and full of potential, but the treatment is atrocious and cringeworthy.

Entertainment

In A Patchwork Quilt, renowned filmmaker Sai Paranjpye reflects on her creative practice, flaws, and failures

Each chapter of A Patchwork Quilt is filled with lively anecdotes, a delightful sense of humour, and an ability to laugh at oneself.

Arts & Culture

19 years since 9/11, examining historical linkages between national crises and pathologising of sexuality

The queer-immigrant-terrorist type is here to stay. It gives the US a ready justification to invest in surveillance technologies targeting Muslims and people of colour, to detain and deport, to live out its unruly visions anchored in homonationalism.

Lifestyle

Muscular India: In a new book, Michiel Baas examines masculinity, mobility and the new middle class

Michiel Baas’ book explores how fitness trainers in the gyms of urban India use their ‘bodily capital’ for ‘upward mobility’

Lifestyle

From Radical Dharma to All About Love, a look at queer Black Buddhist perspectives on spiritual practice in contemporary texts

Several queer Black Buddhist authors have showed me how spiritual practice can be a liberating force in the face of challenges as huge as racism, sexism and queerphobia.

Lifestyle

In reading Friends Under the Summer Sun, envisioning queerness as an experience of unabashed joy

The plot of Friends Under the Summer Sun revolves around a heartwarming encounter between a child named Nimmi and her neighbour Shri who likes to be addressed as Akka.

Lifestyle

Friendship as Social Justice Activism examines unconventional forms of kinship as catalysts for change

How do people who meet as part of movements navigate desire, love and heartbreak? Friendship as Social Justice Activism: Critical Solidarities in a Global Perspective offers similar conversations.

Lifestyle

In Aarti Neharsh's film The Song We Sang, a peek into a world where women live unapologetically

The Song We Sang revolves around the romance between Krishna and Alia, an economist and an animator who meet in Ahmedabad during Navratri.

Lifestyle

In Fearless, Amneh Shaikh-Farooqui offers an illustrated chronicle of Pakistan's women's rights movement

The timeline in Fearless, which begins in 1943 and goes on till 2018, is helpful in understanding the political context within which the Pakistani women featured in the book made their mark.

Lifestyle

The Witch Boy reinforces Wiccan literature as a vital source of spiritual nourishment for queer readers

It is time for us to be more intentional about creating our futures; whether we identify as witches or not, there are things we could learn from them.

Life

Sara Farizan reflects on queer love and law in Iranian society, in If You Could Be Mine

In If You Could Be Mine, Iranian-American writer Sara Farizan looks at her own cultural milieu which forbade and criminalised homosexuality.

Life

In reading Vikram Kolmannskog's Lord of the Senses, examining the possibility, predicament of being queer and Hindu

Lord of the Senses is an unputdownable collection of short stories written by Vikram Kolmannskog and published by the London-based Team Angelica.

Life

Out of Line and Offline: Personal meets political in Pawan Dhall's book about people outside mainstream Indian queer narrative

In Out of Line and Offline, Pawan Dhall is interested in three main questions: How do things appear in retrospect more than 25 years into the queer movements of eastern India? Where or in what state are the people reached out to in the 1990s and later? What bearing do the activisms of the 1990s and early 2000s have on the lives of those individuals today?