Speak, Okinawa book review: Elizabeth Miki Brina’s memoir is a powerful history of her family, US occupation of Okinawa

Elizabeth Miki Brina is vulnerable, raw, and relatable, and her stories will no doubt cause readers to reflect on their relationships with their own parents.

The Associated Press February 25, 2021 15:28:50 IST
Speak, Okinawa book review: Elizabeth Miki Brina’s memoir is a powerful history of her family, US occupation of Okinawa

Elizabeth Miki Brina’s Speak, Okinawa is a masterful memoir in which Brina examines the complex relationship she has with her interracial parents. Brina’s father, white and American, met her mother, who is from the island of Okinawa, while he was stationed there on a US military base. The two settled in the United States, where Brina’s mother spent decades feeling lonely and out of place.

Brina grew up feeling close to her father and resenting her mother. Desperate to feel wholly American, she pushed her mother away, embarrassed of her accent and overall inability to truly assimilate.

In this investigation of her childhood, Brina begins to see things differently. She looks at life from her mother’s perspective, and now, she starts to understand the depth of her pain, pain she endured from leaving behind all she knew and loved, and also the pain of calling occupied land home.

Speak, Okinawa is both a mediation on Brina’s own family as well as a powerful history of the United States occupation of Okinawa, where it maintains a massive military presence to this day.

Brina’s writing is crisp, captivating and profound. She is vulnerable, raw, and relatable, and her stories will no doubt cause readers to reflect on their relationships with their own parents. As educational as it is entertaining, Speak, Okinawa is well worth the read.

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